Biscay


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Bis·cay

 (bĭs′kā), Bay of
An arm of the Atlantic Ocean indenting the western coast of Europe from Brittany in northwest France southward to northwest Spain.

Biscay

(ˈbɪskeɪ; -kɪ)
n
(Placename) Bay of Biscay a large bay of the Atlantic Ocean between W France and N Spain: notorious for storms

Bis•cay

(ˈbɪs keɪ, -ki)

n.
Bay of, a bay of the Atlantic between W France and N Spain.
Translations

Biscay

[ˈbɪskeɪ] NVizcaya f

Biscay

[ˈbɪski ˈbɪskeɪ] n
the Bay of Biscay → le golfe de Gascogne

Biscay

n the Bay of Biscayder Golf von Biskaya or Biscaya

Biscay

[ˈbɪskeɪ] n the Bay of Biscayil golfo di Biscaglia
References in classic literature ?
BISCAY, MARK BOAT reports Caducci (Valandingham Line) slightly spiked in western gorge Point de Benasdue.
The autocrat of the North Atlantic was still oppressing his kingdom and its outlying dependencies, even as far as the Bay of Biscay, in the dismal secrecy of thick, very thick, weather.
Did you ever hear Benjamin sing the ‘Bay of Biscay, 0?”
Le Quoi, as they descended the stairs, on the subject of psalmody, which he closed by a violent eulogium on the air of the “Bay of Biscay, 0,” as particularly connected with his friend Benjamin’s execution.
In the coach there was, as afterwards appeared, a Biscay lady on her way to Seville, where her husband was about to take passage for the Indies with an appointment of high honour.
His thoughts were still in the woods of Minstead and the old armory of Twynham Castle, when the hoarse voice of the master-shipman brought them back once more to the Bay of Biscay.
Already a hand short, and entering the Bay of Biscay with wild weather ahead, and yet last night another man lost, disappeared.
He only told me that it had not occurred in the Mediterranean, but on the other side of Southern France - in the Bay of Biscay. "But this is hardly the place to enter on a story of that kind," he observed, looking round at the room with a faint smile as attractive as the rest of his rustic but well-bred personality.
Having been thus harassed in my thoughts, my old pilot, to whom I communicated everything, pressed me earnestly not to go by sea, but either to go by land to the Groyne, and cross over the Bay of Biscay to Rochelle, from whence it was but an easy and safe journey by land to Paris, and so to Calais and Dover; or to go up to Madrid, and so all the way by land through France.
'Now,' said Jack Hopkins, 'just to set us going again, Bob, I don't mind singing a song.' And Hopkins, incited thereto by tumultuous applause, plunged himself at once into 'The King, God bless him,' which he sang as loud as he could, to a novel air, compounded of the 'Bay of Biscay,' and 'A Frog he would.' The chorus was the essence of the song; and, as each gentleman sang it to the tune he knew best, the effect was very striking indeed.
While the third syllable is in preparation, the band begins a nautical medley--"All in the Downs," "Cease Rude Boreas," "Rule Britannia," "In the Bay of Biscay O!"--some maritime event is about to take place.
Guests will discover and learn about whales and dolphins from wildlife experts from marine conservation charity ORCA, all whilst cruising through some of the world's most renowned whale watching waters - the Bay of Biscay. A third of all known species of whale and dolphin can be seen in the area.