Bisitun


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Related to Bisitun: Behistun Inscription

Bisitun

(ˌbiːsɪˈtuːn)
n
(Placename) another name for Behistun
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References in periodicals archive ?
Their importance can be seen from the famous Persian inscription at Bisitun in western Iran, where Darius I (who did not mess around) took great pleasure in showing off about how he had defeated the Scythians 'utterly'--perhaps not quite fake news, but certainly putting something of a gloss on things.
Given the fact that human fossils from this period have been found in Bisitun and Shanidar caves, it is safe to assume that the residents of the area had most likely been from the Neanderthal species that became extinct about 40,000 years ago," he said.
The first are public documents, often bi- and trilingual, and include the great trilingual inscription of Darius I at Bisitun (DB).
In his monumental Bisitun Inscription, Darius the Great boasts of how the Median pretender Phraortes (Fravartish) "was captured and brought to me.
The view of the Zagros in the distance was breathtaking, Darius's famous monument at Bisitun was right down the road, and there was an excellent hotel in Hamadan with a great restaurant and a pool for weekend respites.
High on a cliff in the town of Bisitun in Persia is an inscription placed there by Darius the Great of Persia.
In my references to the Old Persian text of the Behistun inscription I use the abbreviation DB followed by a number (1-76), indicating the paragraphs, as they are in the edition of the text by Rudiger Schmitt, The Bisitun
The Bisitun Inscriptions of Darius the Great: Old Persian Text (London: School of Oriental and African Studies, 1991),53; see Darius at Susa E, in Kent, 014 Persian, 142.
But such a crass assessment does not do justice to Schmitt's penetrating examination of the evidence for Median names and phonetic elements evidenced in Assyrian, Babylonian (specifically of the Bisitun Inscription), Elamite, Old Persian, and Greek texts.
Most of this chapter is devoted to the decipherment of cuneiform by way of Darius I's Bisitun Inscription and the Achaemenid inscriptions at Persepolis and elsewhere (pp.