Bismarck Archipelago

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Related to Bismark archipelago: New Britain Island

Bismarck Archipelago

A group of volcanic islands and islets of Papua New Guinea in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Long inhabited by Papuan and Austronesian peoples, the islands were annexed by Germany (1884) and passed to Australia (1914) before being included in Papua New Guinea (1975).

Bismarck Archipelago

n
(Placename) a group of over 200 islands in the SW Pacific, northeast of New Guinea: part of Papua New Guinea. Main islands: New Britain, New Ireland, Lavongai, and the Admiralty Islands. Chief town: Rabaul, on New Britain. Pop: 566 610 (2000). Area: 49 658 sq km (19 173 sq miles)

Bis′marck Archipel′ago


n.
a group of islands in Papua New Guinea, in the SW Pacific Ocean, including the Admiralty Islands, New Britain, New Ireland, and adjacent islands. ab. 23,000 sq. mi. (59,570 sq. km).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bismarck Archipelago - a group of islands in the southwestern Pacific to the northeast of New GuineaBismarck Archipelago - a group of islands in the southwestern Pacific to the northeast of New Guinea; part of Papua New Guinea
Melanesia - the islands in the southwestern part of Oceania
Admiralty Islands - a group of islands in the Bismarck Archipelago
New Britain - the largest island in the Bismarck Archipelago; part of Papua New Guinea
Independent State of Papua New Guinea, Papua New Guinea - a parliamentary democracy on the eastern half of the island of New Guinea; in 1975 it became an independent state within the Commonwealth of Nations
New Ireland - an island in the Bismarck Archipelago; part of Papua New Guinea
References in periodicals archive ?
In the last several years, a number of investigators have argued that the most promising place to look for origins of the Lapita culture is the Bismark Archipelago. An international scientific investigation was launched in 1985 called the Lapita Homeland Project, in which 11 field teams, including Kirch's group, explored sites in the Bismark Archipelago that appeared promising.
Some of the material, such as obsidian and chert flakes and stone that was shaped into cutting tools, is available only on other islands in the Bismark Archipelago and, according to Kirch, confirms previous evidence for long-distance trading by the Lapita.
Photo: Map shows the eastward spread of the Lapita people, beginning in the area of New Guinea and the Bismark Archipelago. Bone figurine (inset) was found at the Talepakemalai site.