bisphosphonate


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bis·phos·pho·nate

 (bĭs′fŏs′fə-nāt′)
n.
Any of a class of drugs that decrease bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclasts, used in the treatment of osteoporosis, Paget's disease, bone metastases, and other conditions. Also called diphosphonate.

[bis- + phosphon(ic acid), phosphorous acid (from phosphonium) + -ate.]

bisphosphonate

(ˌbɪsˈfɒsfəneɪt)
n
(Pharmacology) any drug of a class that inhibits the resorption of bone; used in treating certain bone disorders, esp osteoporosis
Translations

bisphosphonate

n bisfosfonato
References in periodicals archive ?
Bisphosphonate drugs, such as alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate (Boniva) and zoledronic acid (Reclast), are proven to combat bone loss and fractures in people with the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis.
In addition to the promising signal of a preventive effect for bisphosphonates, her analysis of Osteoarthritis Initiative data yielded two other major findings: Changes over time in the MRI-based three-dimensional bone shape of the knee constitute a novel structural imaging biomarker that appears to be of value in monitoring patients with OA or at high risk for the joint disease, and bisphosphonate-induced suppression of bone turnover had no adverse long-term impact on osteoarthritis risk.
Several large, population-based, case-control studies have found a temporal relationship between bisphosphonate therapy and a statistically significant increased risk of subtrochanteric fractures.
1,2 Although usage of bisphosphonates is thought to be safe, in 2003, Marx and Stern reported the Bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ).
The vast majority of atypical femur fractures are seen after long-term bisphosphonate use, and many doctors now recommend a five-year limit for taking them, with a periodic assessment of whether the drug is still necessary.
All randomized or prospective matched controlled trials that assessed the efficacy of bisphosphonate for elderly patients with hip fracture were included.
UCB today announced detailed Phase 3 results showing the investigational agent romosozumab demonstrated a statistically significant increase in hip bone mineral density (BMD) and strength compared with teriparatide in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis transitioning from bisphosphonate treatment.
Bisphosphonate compounds are reported to have antibacterial, herbicidal, anticancer, and antiparasitic properties, and they are also reported to be involved in the activation of T cells [15-17].
Bisphosphonate associated fractures commonly involve lower extremities particularly seen in femur subtrochanteric location [5-7].
Low energy atypical fractures of femoral shaft and pelvis in patients who are on long-term bisphosphonate therapy were described in 2005.
In addition, expanded bisphosphonate use could cause nearly 20,000 more atypical femur fractures in this population, Dr.