hearts

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heart

 (härt)
n.
1. Anatomy
a. The chambered muscular organ in vertebrates that pumps blood received from the veins into the arteries, thereby maintaining the flow of blood through the entire circulatory system.
b. A similarly functioning structure in invertebrates.
2. The area that is the approximate location of the heart in the body; the breast.
3.
a. The vital center and source of one's being, emotions, and sensibilities.
b. The repository of one's deepest and sincerest feelings and beliefs: an appeal from the heart; a subject dear to her heart.
c. The seat of the intellect or imagination: the worst atrocities the human heart could devise.
4.
a. Emotional constitution, basic disposition, or character: a man after my own heart.
b. One's prevailing mood or current inclination: We were light of heart.
5.
a. Capacity for sympathy or generosity; compassion: a leader who seems to have no heart.
b. Love; affection: The child won my heart.
6.
a. Courage; resolution; fortitude: The soldiers lost heart and retreated.
b. The firmness of will or the callousness required to carry out an unpleasant task or responsibility: hadn't the heart to send them away without food.
7. A person esteemed or admired as lovable, loyal, or courageous: a dear heart.
8.
a. The central or innermost physical part of a place or region: the heart of the financial district.
b. The core of a plant, fruit, or vegetable, such as a heart of palm.
9. The most important or essential part: get to the heart of the matter.
10. A conventional two-lobed representation of the heart, usually colored red or pink.
11. Games
a. A red, heart-shaped figure on certain playing cards.
b. A playing card with this figure.
c. hearts(used with a sing. or pl. verb) The suit of cards represented by this figure.
d. A card game in which the object is either to avoid hearts when taking tricks or to take all the hearts.
tr.v. heart·ed, heart·ing, hearts
1. Slang To have great liking or affection for: I heart chocolate chip cookies!
2. Archaic To encourage; hearten.
Idioms:
at heart
In one's deepest feelings; fundamentally.
by heart
Learned by rote; memorized word for word.
do (one's) heart good
To lift one's spirits; make one happy.
from the bottom/depths of (one's) heart
With the deepest appreciation; most sincerely.
have (one's) heart in (one's) mouth
To be extremely frightened or anxious.
have (one's) heart in the right place
To be well-intentioned.
heart and soul
Completely; entirely.
in (one's) heart of hearts
In the seat of one's truest feelings.
lose (one's) heart to
To fall in love with.
near/close to (one's) heart
Loved by or important to one.
steal (someone's) heart
To win one's affection or love.
take to heart
To take seriously and be affected or troubled by: Don't take my criticism to heart.
to (one's) heart's content
To one's entire satisfaction, without limitation.
wear (one's) heart on (one's) sleeve
To show one's feelings clearly and openly by one's behavior.
with all (one's) heart
1. With great willingness or pleasure.
2. With the deepest feeling or devotion.
with half a heart
In a halfhearted manner.

[Middle English hert, from Old English heorte; see kerd- in Indo-European roots. V., sense 1, from the use of a heart shape to represent the verb love, originally between the letters I and NY in merchandise meant to be read I love New York.]

hearts

(hɑːts)
n
(Card Games) (functioning as singular) a card game in which players must avoid winning tricks containing hearts or the queen of spades. Also called: Black Maria
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hearts - a form of whist in which players avoid winning tricks containing hearts or the queen of spadeshearts - a form of whist in which players avoid winning tricks containing hearts or the queen of spades
long whist, short whist, whist - a card game for four players who form two partnerships; a pack of 52 cards is dealt and each side scores one point for each trick it takes in excess of six
Translations
الكوبة في ورق اللعب
srdce
hjerter
copas (cards)corazones
hertta
kőr
hjarta/hjörtu
hartenhartenjagen
hjärter

heart

(haːt) noun
1. the organ which pumps blood through the body. How fast does a person's heart beat?; (also adjective) heart disease; a heart specialist.
2. the central part. I live in the heart of the city; in the heart of the forest; the heart of a lettuce; Let's get straight to the heart of the matter/problem.
3. the part of the body where one's feelings, especially of love, conscience etc are imagined to arise. She has a kind heart; You know in your heart that you ought to go; She has no heart (= She is not kind).
4. courage and enthusiasm. The soldiers were beginning to lose heart.
5. a symbol supposed to represent the shape of the heart; a white dress with little pink hearts on it; heart-shaped.
6. one of the playing-cards of the suit hearts, which have red symbols of this shape on them.
-hearted
kind-hearted; hard-hearted; broken-hearted.
ˈhearten verb
to encourage or cheer up. We were greatly heartened by the good news.
ˈheartless adjective
cruel; very unkind. a heartless remark.
ˈheartlessly adverb
ˈheartlessness noun
hearts noun plural
(sometimes treated as noun singular) one of the four card suits. the two of hearts.
ˈhearty adjective
1. very friendly. a hearty welcome.
2. enthusiastic. a hearty cheer.
3. very cheerful; too cheerful. a hearty person/laugh.
4. (of meals) large. He ate a hearty breakfast.
5. (of a person's appetite) large.
ˈheartily adverb
ˈheartiness noun
ˈheartache noun
(a feeling of) great sadness.
heart attack
a sudden failure of the heart to function correctly, sometimes causing death. My father has had a slight heart attack.
ˈheartbeat noun
(the sound of) the regular movement of the heart.
ˈheartbreak noun
(something which causes) great sorrow. I have suffered many heartbreaks in my life.
ˈheartbroken adjective
feeling very great sorrow. a heartbroken widow.
ˈheartburn noun
a burning feeling in the chest caused by indigestion. She suffers from heartburn after meals.
heart failure
the sudden stopping of the heart's beating. the old man died of heart failure.
ˈheartfelt adjective
sincere. heartfelt thanks.
ˌheart-to-ˈheart adjective
open and sincere, usually in private. I'm going to have a heart-to-heart talk with him.
noun
an open and sincere talk, usually in private. After our heart-to-heart I felt more cheerful.
ˈheart-warming adjective
causing a person to feel pleasure. It was heart-warming to see the happiness of the children.
at heart
really; basically. He seems rather stern but he is at heart a very kind man.
break someone's heart
to cause someone great sorrow. If you leave her, it'll break her heart.
by heart
from memory; by memorizing. The children know their multiplication tables by heart; Actors must learn their speeches (off) by heart.
from the bottom of one's heart
very sincerely. She thanked him from the bottom of her heart.
have a change of heart
to change a decision etc, usually to a better, kinder one. He's had a change of heart – he's going to help us after all.
have a heart!
show some pity!.
have at heart
to have a concern for or interest in. He has the interest of his workers at heart.
heart and soul
with all one's attention and energy. She devoted herself heart and soul to caring for her husband.
lose heart
to become discouraged.
not have the heart to
not to want or be unkind enough to (do something unpleasant). I don't have the heart to tell him that everyone laughed at his suggestions.
set one's heart on / have one's heart set on
to want very much. He had set his heart on winning the prize; He had his heart set on winning.
take heart
to become encouraged or more confident.
take to heart
1. to be made very sad or upset by. You mustn't take his unkind remarks to heart.
2. to pay attention to. He's taken my criticism to heart – his work has improved.
to one's heart's content
as much as one wants. She could play in the big garden to her heart's content.
with all one's heart
very willingly or sincerely. I hope with all my heart that you will be happy.
References in classic literature ?
But he is a pleasant, good humoured fellow, and has got the nicest little black bitch of a pointer I ever saw.
There was an EDL-affiliated Twitter account PSBURNDIANEABBOTT, I've had rape threats, described as a pathetic, useless fat black, piece of s***, ugly fat black bitch and n***.
The 27kg black bitch, trained by Lisa Stephenson, slipped free as she was in the process of being placed in trap three in an A4 event with the start of racing delayed for 40 minutes while attempts were made to catch her.
A significant example of this is a character named Black Bitch in Sanchez's play The Bronx is Next (1968).
Or consider a black bitch with a yellow sire and black dam.
Now captive of the very vile villainess The Black Bitch, Rod must fight for his life as her fetid airship plummets towards the skyland of Vicaria - lair of its mad (and possibly evil) ruler Victor Vicario; well known for injecting his visitors with his latest concoctions.
One employee complained she had been called a black bitch, another woman alleged she had been called a whore and a male colleague alleged he had been sexually harassed," said William Hamilton who represented the complainants at an employment tribunal where Cordiner unsuccessfully challenged the decision.
Meyers identifies older core sterotypes (sexual Jezebel, emasculating Sapphire, respectable church lady, criminal black bitch) and a newer one (dangerous Black Bitch with economic or political power).
He said to me 'what does that black bitch want now?
NTRAINER Amanda Varley and owner Mr M Johnson are delighted with the form of their black bitch Sicamous who is three years old this month and showing a rich vein of form with a hat-trick of wins over the standard 480 distance.
One particularly striking image Collins describes is the "new" image of the middle-class "Educated Black Bitch," which, she suggests, illustrates how black women's financial success is devalued, pathologized, and perceived as a problem for black social and economic progress (184).