Black Hole of Calcutta


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Black Hole of Calcutta

n
1. (Historical Terms) a small dungeon in which in 1756 the Nawab of Bengal reputedly confined 146 English prisoners, of whom only 23 survived
2. informal chiefly Brit any uncomfortable or overcrowded place
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Noun1.Black Hole of Calcutta - a dungeon (20 feet square) in a fort in Calcutta where as many as 146 English prisoners were held overnight by Siraj-ud-daulaBlack Hole of Calcutta - a dungeon (20 feet square) in a fort in Calcutta where as many as 146 English prisoners were held overnight by Siraj-ud-daula; the next morning only 23 were still alive
References in classic literature ?
It was the Black Hole of Calcutta on a small scale.
The Black Hole of Calcutta must have been a fool to it; indeed, to this moment I do not know how we lived through the day.
1756: Night of the Black Hole Of Calcutta. Some 146 English prisoners were put into a cell measuring 18ft by 14ft on a hot June evening when the Nawab of Bengal captured Fort William.
www.expressandstar.com 1756: Night of the Black Hole Of Calcutta. Some 146 English prisoners were put into a cell measuring 18ft by 14ft on a hot June evening when the Nawab of Bengal captured Fort William.
1756: Night of the Black Hole Of Calcutta. Some 146 English prisoners were put in a cell measuring 18ft by 14ft on a hot June night when the Nawab of Bengal captured Fort William.
Amid the wonky toilets and Black Hole of Calcutta conditions, they cling on to the romanticism of rail travel.
After paying, we walked into what I can only describe as a dark grotto similar to the black hole of Calcutta. We couldn't see a f*** thing.
In my defence, many times I've spent my weekends in health and safety-busting music venues that made the Black Hole of Calcutta look like the Albert Hall.
Siblings John, Patrick, and Gideon all went to India, where Patrick died in the Black Hole of Calcutta. Two sisters, Barbara and Margaret, chose the wrong side in the Jacobite uprising in 1745, the latter fleeing to France with her husband.
Starting with the 'Black Hole of Calcutta' incident of 1756, Tickell examines textual representations of some of the most emblematic moments in the history of the Raj: the suppression of 'Thuggee' in the 1830s (contemporarily and discursively related to the abolition of widow-burning, or sati, and the practice of human sacrifice amongst 'tribal' groups), the 'Mutiny' or Indian Uprising of 1857, the Indian Revolutionaries of early twentieth-century London and, finally, the Amritsar Massacre of 1919 and rise of Gandhi as appropriate end pieces.
The Black Hole of Calcutta may have been "one of the great British icons of the historical mythology of the Raj" (p.
When protests against the militarisation of Kalikata by the then Nawab of Bengal, Siraj-ud-Daulah, went unheeded, he attacked and captured the fort (Fort William) in 1756, leading to the famous 'Black Hole of Calcutta' incident.