Black Muslims


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Black Muslims

n
(Islam) (esp in the US) a political and religious movement of Black people who adopt the religious practices of Islam and seek to establish a new Black nation. Official name: Nation of Islam

Black Muslims

A political movement of black people adapting Islamic religious practices and seeking to establish a black nation.
References in periodicals archive ?
r=0) report by the New York Times in 2012, Malcolm X was fatally shot by assassins who were black Muslims.
Kennedy invited 11 African-Americans activists to his father's plush Central Park apartment, he did so under the pretext that he wanted to listen to their concerns; see what more his brother John, the president, could do to bring about equality for blacks; and learn how they might join forces against the more militant Black Muslims.
There is, and always has been, an erasure of Black Muslims from our historical teachings in America, just as there is an erasure of Black and Muslim cultures worldwide.
The prison-based narrative among young Black men is most popularly seen in 1990s films such as South Central (1992) and Malcolm X (1992), as well as the one-hour HBO television drama Oz (1997-2003), in which writers pay tribute to the legacy and impact of imprisoned Black Muslims.
He famously discarded his slave name of Cassius Clay immediately after first winning the title adopting the name Muhammad Ali, swearing allegiance to the Black Muslims and embarking on a campaign for black civil rights.
We got white Muslims, brown Muslims, yellow Muslims, tan Muslims, red Muslims and black muslims - we're the same all over.
Insults against Muslims have increased in the US officials' statements and lack of religious tolerance coupled with racial discrimination, specially against black Muslims, have turned to a routine practice of the US public institutions, specially the (US) police, and the US government has failed to take any effective measure to prevent this trend," Afkham added.
Black Muslims and the Law: Civil Liberties From Elijah Muhammad to Muhammad (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2015, pp.
A total of 13 percent are what is commonly called Black Muslims.
The faith was the theology propounded by the Nation of Islam (NOI), a sect often referred to as the Black Muslims.
The only really risqu comment he makes compares black Muslims with gay ginger people but this still isn't as controversial as it looks in print.
The author explores how the experience of being Muslim in America can be quite different for South-Asian immigrants who generally enjoy more class mobility and working-class Black Muslims.