Special Boat Service

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Special Boat Service

n
(Military) a unit of the Royal Marines specializing in reconnaissance and sabotage
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That they more greatly feared an attack from the rear than whatever unknown enemies lurked in their advance was evidenced by the formation of the column; and such was the fact, for they were fleeing from the white man's soldiers who had so harassed them for rubber and ivory that they had turned upon their conquerors one day and massacred a white officer and a small detachment of his black troops.
The national organization, however, failed to press the case for pensions for black soldiers, and most black troops never received any pension or remuneration for wounds incurred during their service.
Most of the black troops had never been out of the South or experienced snow, much less the severe weather of Alaska.
One of the Smithsonian's "100 Most Significant Americans of All Time," Truth helped to recruit Black troops for the Union Army during the Civil War.
Black troops are as much as two times more likely than whites to face military punishment, according to (http://www.
Questioning Roosevelt's action in discharging black troops without a trial for their alleged shooting raid on the town of Brownsville, Texas, in August 1906, Weaver showed that the evidence against the men was flimsy and that the men were likely innocent.
In general, he said, the white GIs resented the Italians far more than the black troops did.
He deftly illustrates how the Patriots regularly undermined their own propaganda about Liberty and natural rights by protecting slavery as an institution and frequently weakened themselves militarily by refusing to raise badly needed black troops out of both fear and a perceived need to appease the southern slavocracy.
This study explores the role of black African soldiers fighting in Europe during WWI, demonstrating that the presence of black troops in France and Germany led to an escalation in the debate about race, blacks, and the legitimacy of their deployment in Europe during the period.
Drawing on a rich and untapped collection of Payne's personal papers documenting her private and professional affairs, the author combed through oral histories, FBI documents, and newspapers to fully capture Payne's life, her achievements, and her legacy as he introduces us to a journalist who covered such events as the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Little Rock school desegregation crisis, the service of black troops in Vietnam, and Henry Kissinger's 26,000-mile tour of Africa.
A Union soldier who rose to prominence during the bloodiest battles of the Civil War, Adolphus Washington Greely went on to command black troops in yellow-fever-ridden New Orleans, survive a brutal three years in Greenland, tame mobs after the San Francisco earthquake, organize the National Geographic Society, and, at 91, become the oldest person to receive the United States Congressional Medal of Honor.
They were excluded from many victory parades, including the main parade in Paris, despite the fact that black troops from England and France were included.