black gum

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black gum

or black·gum (blăk′gŭm′)
n.
A deciduous tree (Nyssa sylvatica) of eastern North America, having glossy, somewhat leathery leaves that turn bright scarlet or orange in the fall. Also called pepperidge, sour gum.

sour′ gum`


n.
a tupelo, Nyssa sylvatica, of E North America, with egg-shaped leaves and round, dark blue fruit.
Also called black gum, pepperidge.
[1775–85, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.black gum - columnar tree of eastern North America having horizontal limbs and small leaves that emerge late in spring and have brilliant color in early fallblack gum - columnar tree of eastern North America having horizontal limbs and small leaves that emerge late in spring and have brilliant color in early fall
tupelo tree, tupelo - any of several gum trees of swampy areas of North America
2.black gum - a small mallee with rough dark-colored bark toward the butt; yields a red eucalyptus kino gum
mallee - any of several low-growing Australian eucalypts
References in periodicals archive ?
Oleaceae), blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica Marshall; Cornaceae), oak (Quercus spp.
It's no wonder this vibrant northeast Mississippi town is named for the blackgum or Tupelo trees that once dotted its landscape.
Available trees include: balsam fir, beech, blackgum, Carolina silverbell, cherry (flowering only), Colorado spruce, crabapple, dawn redwood, dogwood (possibly), Fraser fir, fringetree, hawthorn, honeylocust, hop-hornbeam, hornbeam, Japanese stewartia, Japanese tree lilac, dogwood, larch, linden (all varieties), Norway spruce, pin oak, oak (red, white and swamp white), sweetgum, tulip tree, white fir, white pine, yellowwood, and zelkova.
They like blueberry, dogwood, hawthorn, holly, beautyberry, blackgum, serviceberry and viburnum.
Deer will go where the most abundant forage is located, whether that resource is wheat, sunflowers, blueberries, forbs, blackgum, coralberry, cranberries, acorn mast, oak buds, shin oak, maple buds, grapes, persimmon, snowberry, honeysuckle, greenbrier, blackberries, sumac bushes or cottonwood.
The Sinking Pond watershed has at least seven tree community types (Patterson, 1989) comprised primarily of: blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica Marshall), northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.
40 Lingfield The town in Mississippi was originally named Gum Pond before the Civil War, due to the high number of tupelo trees, locally known as blackgum, that grow in the area.
The wet areas are home to Swamp and Water Tupelos, Bald Cypress, Blackgum and Overcup Oaks.
The Messenger," a Blackgum Production of an animated Cherokee story in the Cherokee language with English subtitles; 2 p.
Very old trees (over 250 years) of both coniferous and hardwood species include hemlock, white pine, blackgum, sugar maple, beech, chestnut oak, and white oak.
In 1902 Redbird Smith, breaking away from the Four Mothers Society, led a renewal of the Oklahoma Cherokee Ketoowa or Night-Hawk Society and laid out a traditional ceremonial ground on Blackgum Mountain.