blank verse

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blank verse

n.
Unrhymed verse having a regular meter, most commonly iambic pentameter.

blank verse

n
(Poetry) prosody unrhymed verse, esp in iambic pentameters

blank′ verse′


n.
unrhymed verse.
[1580–90]

blank verse

- A verse without rhyme.
See also related terms for rhyme.

blank verse

Unrhymed verse, often (especially in Shakespeare) in iambic pentameters.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blank verse - unrhymed verse (usually in iambic pentameter)
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
Translations
References in classic literature ?
7] If the invasion of the legitimate sphere of prose in England by the spirit of poetry, weaker or stronger, has been something far deeper than is indicated by that tendency to write unconscious blank verse, which has made it feasible to transcribe about one-half of Dickens's otherwise so admirable Barnaby Rudge in blank-verse lines, a tendency (outdoing our old friend M.
If I had been annoyed in any manner--if my washerwoman had discharged me, for instance; or my blank-verse poem had been returned for the tenth time, with the editor's compliments "and regrets that owing to want of space he is unable to avail himself of kind offer;" or I had been snubbed by the woman I loved as man never loved before--by the way, it's really extraordinary what a variety of ways of loving there must be.
The blank-verse English is in readable vernacular, without archaisms.
Byron certainly posited such a contradiction when he declared Wordsworth and his conversational blank-verse forbear Cowper "no poet[s].
His contribution to the general development of blank verse between Milton and the Romantics has been commented on widely, but Hartman showed more specifically the crucial role that Akenside's 'Inscription' played in the creation of the short blank-verse form which was so extensively used by his successors.
Containing 50 scenes of blank-verse dialogue, about 22,000 lines in all, it was first published anonymously.
He then wrote All for Love, or The World Well Last, a blank-verse tragedy based on Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra.