Blanqui


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Blanqui

(French blɑ̃kɪ)
n
(Biography) Louis Auguste (French lwi oɡyst). 1805–81, French revolutionary, who organized secret socialist societies and preached violent insurrection; he spent over 30 years in prison
References in periodicals archive ?
A new secret group, la Societe des Familles (later restructured as la Societe des Saisons), led by Louis-Auguste Blanqui, Armand Barbes and Martin-Bernard was created.
Present on the barricades during the February days, the "republicains de la veille" (including Barbes and Blanqui) had been largely marginalized, either by arrest or flight, for their participation in several public demonstrations, notably those of March 17, April 16 and May 15, which were seen as attempts by the extremists to purge the government of its moderate members.
Basteme declarar que Bioy renueva literariamente un concepto que San Agustin y Origenes refutaron, que Louis Auguste Blanqui razono y que dijo con musica memorable Dante Gabriel Rossetti: I have been here before, Bur when or how I cannot tell: I know the grass beyond the door, The sweet keen smell, The sighing sound, the lights around the shore ...
Alegar a Blanqui, para encarecer la teoria de la pluralidad de los mundos, fue tal vez un merito de Servian; yo, mas limitado, hubiera propuesto la autoridad de un clasico; por ejemplo, "segun Democrito, hay una infinidad de mundos entre los cuales algunos son, no tan solo parecidos, sino perfectamente iguales" (Ciceron, Primeras Academicas, II, 18).
I find it unlikely that the great historian's take on the Kabbalah as being "anarchist" would have made him forget Blanqui's famous motto "Neither God nor Master." This is not to deny Newman's interest in the Kabbalah, in Scholem, or the role his Jewish background played in his aesthetic formation.
Accordingly, Say is the fountainhead of three liberal trends: the "ultra-liberals" (Charles Dunoyer, Frederic Bastiat, Joseph Garnier and Jean-Gustave Courcelle-Seneuil), the "moderate liberals" (Adolphe-Jerome Blanqui, Louis Wolowski and Paul Leroy-Beaulieu) and the "heterodox liberals" (Michel Chevalier and Clement Juglar).