Blatterer

Blat´ter`er


n.1.One who blatters; a babbler; a noisy, blustering boaster.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harry Blatterer's Everyday Friendships makes a significant and original contribution to the scholarship on personal and intimate life.
The source of friendship's relational freedom lies in what Blatterer calls its "institutional deficit" (65).
Gender is a central theme of the book, and Blatterer devotes two of the book's six chapters to the questions of gender and sexuality.
Blatterer's approach is to theorize friendship under the rubric of intimacy, and in doing so he has stressed the need for a precise and restricted way of conceptualizing friendship in the social sciences.
The reconfiguration of coming of age experiences, youth and adulthood in The Almighty Johnsons therefore intersects with Andrew King's comments about Harry Blatterer's book on redefinitions of contemporary adulthood in most advanced industrial societies: "the values of youth have now permeated the life course.
Review of Coming of Age in Times of Uncertainty: Redefining Contemporary Adulthood by Harry Blatterer (New York/ Oxford: Berghahn 2007).
Yet a defining and paradoxical feature of youth is that it is a transitional life phase, and therefore 'liminal' (Thompson, 2010: 397; Blatterer, 2010: 69).
Other studies point out an increase in the abundance of most ciliate species according to the amount of organic pollution (BLATTERER, 2002; DIAS et al., 2008; MADONI; BRAGHIROLI, 2007).
Rundell, John, 'The Erotic Imaginary, Autonomy and Modernity' in Modern Privacy Shifting Boundaries, New Forms, edited by Harry Blatterer, Pauline Johnson, and Maria R.
See John Rundell, 'The Erotic Imaginary, Autonomy and Modernity' in Modern Privacy Shifting Boundaries, New Forms, edited by Harry Blatterer, Pauline Johnson, and Maria R.
Most people in Western culture think rarely if ever about what adulthood is, when it starts and stops, what its features are or should be, and the like, says Blatterer (sociology, Macquarie U., Sydney), but that makes the questions--indeed the stage of life itself--more mysterious rather than less.