Bluebeard

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blue·beard

 (blo͞o′bîrd′)
n.
A man who first marries and then murders one wife after another.

[After Blue Beard, translation of French Barbe Bleue, a character in a story by Charles Perrault (1628-1703).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bluebeard

(ˈbluːˌbɪəd)
n
1. (European Myth & Legend) a villain in European folk tales who marries several wives and murders them in turn. In many versions the seventh and last wife escapes the fate of the others
2. a man who has had several wives
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Blue•beard

(ˈbluˌbɪərd)

n.
a man who successively marries and murders several wives.
[after the villain in a fairy tale by C. Perrault]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bluebeard - (fairytale) a monstrous villain who marries seven women; he kills the first six for disobedience
fairy story, fairy tale, fairytale - a story about fairies; told to amuse children
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Ridder Blåskjegg

Bluebeard

[ˈbluːbɪəd] NBarba Azul
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Davies also offers a virtuoso reading of the forgotten novella Blaubart (1866) by the hugely successful writer of popular fiction, Eugenie Marlitt.
His later novels include Montauk (1975), Der Mensch erscheint im Holozan (1979; Man in the Holocene), and Blaubart (1982; Bluebeard).