blockbuster

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block·bust·er

 (blŏk′bŭs′tər)
n.
1. Something, such as a film or book, that sustains widespread popularity and achieves enormous sales.
2. A large, powerful bomb used especially in air raids on cities.
3. One that engages in the practice of blockbusting.

[Sense 3, from blockbusting.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

blockbuster

(ˈblɒkˌbʌstə)
n
1. (Military) a large bomb used to demolish extensive areas or strengthened targets
2. a very successful, effective, or forceful person, thing, etc
3. a lavish film, show, novel, etc, that proves to be an outstanding popular success
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

block•bust•er

(ˈblɒkˌbʌs tər)

n.
1. a huge aerial demolition bomb.
2. a motion picture, novel, etc. that has wide popular appeal or financial success.
3. a person or thing that is overwhelmingly impressive, effective, or influential.
4. one who practices blockbusting.
[1940–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blockbuster - a large bomb used to demolish extensive areas (as a city block)blockbuster - a large bomb used to demolish extensive areas (as a city block)
general-purpose bomb, GP bomb - a large bomb (500 to 2,000 pounds that is 50% explosive) whose explosion creates a blast and whose metal casing creates some fragmentation effect
2.blockbuster - an unusually successful hit with widespread popularity and huge sales (especially a movie or play or recording or novel)blockbuster - an unusually successful hit with widespread popularity and huge sales (especially a movie or play or recording or novel)
hit, smasher, smash, bang, strike - a conspicuous success; "that song was his first hit and marked the beginning of his career"; "that new Broadway show is a real smasher"; "the party went with a bang"
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
korttelipommi
kasszasiker
izjemna uspešnica

blockbuster

[ˈblɒkˌbʌstəʳ] N
1. (= film) → exitazo m, gran éxito m de taquilla; (= book) → exitazo m, best-seller m
2. (Mil) → bomba f revientamanzanas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

blockbuster

[ˈblɒkbʌstər] n (= film) → grand succès m (= book) → best-seller mblock capitals nplmajuscules fpl d'imprimerie
in block capitals → en majuscules d'imprimerie
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

blockbuster

[ˈblɒkˌbʌstəʳ] n (fam) (film, TV series) → successone m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Blockbusters: Comedy Central, 8pm, Thursday Telly favourite Dara O Briain is now the face of the iconic game show Blockbusters.
Sandi Harding, the general manager of the Oregon Blockbuster, expressed her sadness when two stores in Alaska closed in July, (https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/06/business/last-blockbuster-on-the-planet-trnd/index.html) telling CNN at the time, "We all have a kinship with the other Blockbusters."
Elberse, Anita, Blockbusters: Hit-making, Risk-taking and the Big Business of Entertainment, Scribe, Melbourne, 2013, ISBN 9 7819 2207 0692 (pb), 307 pp., A$32.99.
An excerpt from Harvard Business School professor Anita Elberse's new book "Blockbusters: Hit-making, Risk-taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment" disputing the "long tail" theory that digital media would dilute Hollywood's blockbuster business caught readers' fancy.
Blockbusters have 528 stores across the UK employing 4190 staff.
Blockbuster says it plans a streaming service this year and, with Netflix having a limited list of films running into a few thousand compared with Blockbusters' monster menu, the veteran is not unduly worried yet.
TRIBUTES were paid last night to Bob Holness, the former host of cult TV quiz show Blockbusters, who has died, aged 83.
Dubai: Having started practising for Blockbusters a year in advance with the help of his teacher, Aayush Rajasekharan was able to win Heat 6 of the Blockbusters Seniors Singles on Monday.
Twenty-five years ago, California gave birth to two blockbusters: ballot initiatives designed to attract voters to the polls, and movies intended to drive crowds to the theaters on opening weekend.
Simply tell us the name of Blockbusters' new exchange service.
Lynn and Reilly explain that "these five practices fit together like interlocking pieces to a puzzle, and it was this `fit' that helped teams create blockbusters. Implementing one or two of the practices is not enough."
But contemporary blockbusters are fundamentally incoherent; they consist of assemblages of fragments, each of which is designed to push the buttons of a particular demographic.