complete blood count

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complete blood count

n. Abbr. CBC
The determination of the quantity of each type of blood cell in a given sample of blood, often including the amount of hemoglobin, the hematocrit, and the proportions of various white cells.

complete′ blood′ count`


n.
a diagnostic test that determines the exact numbers of each type of blood cell in a fixed quantity of blood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.complete blood count - counting the number of white and red blood cells and the number of platelets in 1 cubic millimeter of blood
blood count - the act of estimating the number of red and white corpuscles in a blood sample
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, a friend familiar with diabetes urged Prominski to get a full blood panel, which revealed that her blood sugar was at 600 milligrams per deciliter --high enough to trigger a diabetic coma.
Aside from nonprofit momentum, even state government gets involved in terms of sponsorships, with the Alaska Department of Administration's Division of Retirement and Benefits offering free blood tests to its AlaskaCare members at its November health fairs in Fairbanks, Juneau, Ketchikan, and Anchorage, some of which include flu shots and chemistry/hematology blood panel testing.
The blood panel manufacturer could add an IFIH1 allele indicator to their test, and flag that one-in-a-thousand baby that will need special attention at flu season," he wrote.
A basic blood panel is recommended in our clinic at least twice annually for our healthy patients.
A CBC-Chemistry blood panel provides an abundance of markers of organ function along with vascular and hematological health for the low cost of just $26 when ordered through Life Extension[R] during our Blood Test Super Sale.
The blood panel establishes a baseline for a wide variety of hormones, such as insulin, thyroid, Cortisol and sex hormones (e.
Results suggest some differences in WBC count, bile acids, calcium, cholesterol, hemoglobin, and phosphorus values between blood samples collected by jugular venipuncture and samples collected by toe nail clip, but the differences are mostly minor and, with the possible exception of inorganic phosphorus and marginally elevated or very low WBC counts, are unlikely to affect the use or interpretation of the avian blood panel.
FPG is inexpensive and globally available, and it is a standard part of a routine blood panel.