blood vessel

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blood vessel

n.
An elastic tubular channel, such as an artery, a vein, or a capillary, through which the blood circulates.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

blood vessel

n
(Anatomy) an artery, capillary, or vein
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

blood′ ves`sel


n.
any channel through which the blood normally circulates; an artery, vein, or capillary.
[1685–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

blood vessel

An elastic tube or passage in the body through which blood circulates; an artery, a vein, or a capillary.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blood vessel - a vessel in which blood circulatesblood vessel - a vessel in which blood circulates  
arteria, arterial blood vessel, artery - a blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the body
vas, vessel - a tube in which a body fluid circulates
ductus arteriosus - a blood vessel in a fetus that bypasses pulmonary circulation by connecting the pulmonary artery directly to the ascending aorta; normally closes at birth
vasa vasorum - any small blood vessel ramifying on the outside of a major artery or vein
vein, vena, venous blood vessel - a blood vessel that carries blood from the capillaries toward the heart; "all veins except the pulmonary vein carry unaerated blood"
capillary vessel, capillary - any of the minute blood vessels connecting arterioles with venules
cardiovascular system, circulatory system - the organs and tissues involved in circulating blood and lymph through the body
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

blood vessel

noun vein, artery He's ruptured a blood vessel.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

blood vessel

nvaso sanguigno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He studied the effects of adrenin on various parts of the body; he found that it causes the pupils to dilate, hairs to stand erect, blood vessels to be constricted, and so on.
He came near to bursting a blood vessel in an endeavor to scream "come in" through the stifling gag.
Evis Lucera - a digestive tract video scope used for observing of blood vessels in mucous membranes under infrared light.
Not only do these tiny particles home in on tumors, but they also stick together once they enter tumors' blood vessels. The particles could eventually be a means to choke off the blood vessels that deliver nutrients to tumors or to ferry cancer-killing drugs, researchers report.
Stroke is a form of cardiovascular disease affecting the blood vessels of the brain.
According to the most recent findings, VEGFR-3 halts angiogenesis (blood vessel growth) by acting as a "sink" to bind or neutralize the growth factors sent by the body to stimulate the spread of blood vessels.
Chemotactant proteins are expressed on the endothelial cell of the dilated blood vessels that serve as recruitment factors for lymphocytes.
If blood flow is restricted because of a buildup of plaque or clots in blood vessels, or if blood vessels become too stiff to enable the smooth flow of blood, less oxygen gets to the brain and fewer waste products leave the brain, he notes.
"At the same time, cocaine is decreasing the amount of blood flowing to the heart muscle, or blocking blood flow completely." This is because the drug constricts blood vessels.
They make the heart beat faster and cause blood vessels to narrow--which can make you feel nervous and jittery.
Among other things, he is researching new methods to more accurately promote the growth of blood vessels (angiogenesis) to oxygen-starved heart muscle and conversely inhibit growth of blood vessels (antiangiogenesis) to combat cancers.