blood meal

(redirected from Bloodmeal)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

blood meal

n.
1. The dried and powdered blood of animals, used in animal feeds and as a nitrogen-rich fertilizer for plants.
2. The blood ingested in one feeding by a blood-sucking insect or arachnid such as a mosquito or tick.

blood′ meal`


n.
the dried blood of animals used as a fertilizer, diet supplement for livestock, or deer repellent.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.blood meal - the dried and powdered blood of animals
feed, provender - food for domestic livestock
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of infectious virus dose and bloodmeal delivery method on susceptibility of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus to chikungunya virus.
Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence and bloodmeal analysis in Triatomine vectors of Chagas disease from rural peridomestic locations in Texas, 2013-2014.
The feeding process of Cimex lectularius (Linnaeus 1758) and Cimex hemipterus (Fabricius 1803) on different bloodmeal sources.
Add organic fertilizer such as bloodmeal, ground peanut cake, alfalfa meal, or bonemeal.
Evaluation of potential West Nile virus vectors in Volgograd region, Russia, 2003 (Diptera: Culicidae): species composition, bloodmeal host utilization, and virus infection rates of mosquitoes.
Identification of mosquito bloodmeal source by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profile analysis of the cytochrome B gene.
Seven to nine days are required for complete the life cycle Feeding Habit Hematophagous Habitat Remain the most part of the time in the environment, climbing at night into the host body to perform the necessary bloodmeal Hosts Chickens, other wild and domestic birds, humans and other mammals Ornithonyssus spp.
African malaria mosquitoes, Anopheles gambiae, use their olfactory organs, two antennae, two mouthparts (maxillary palps) and the proboscis, to search for their hosts to obtain a bloodmeal.
During the taking of a bloodmeal malaria transmission occurs between host and vector.
Ingestion of infected feedstuffs, such as bloodmeal or bonemeal, has also been implicated as a cause of infection.
Comparison between precipitin and ELISA tests in the bloodmeal detection of Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) and Aedes fluviatilis (Lutz) mosquitoes experimentally fed on feline, canine and human hosts.