supergiant

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su·per·gi·ant

 (so͞o′pər-jī′ənt)
n.
Any of various very massive, large, and bright stars, such as Betelgeuse or Rigel, having a luminosity that is thousands of times greater than that of the sun. When a supergiant collapses into a supernova, it may result in either a neutron star or a black hole.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

supergiant

(ˈsuːpəˌdʒaɪənt)
n
(Astronomy) any of a class of extremely large and luminous stars, such as Betelgeuse, which have expanded to a large diameter and are eventually likely to explode as supernovae. Compare giant star, white dwarf
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

su•per•gi•ant

(ˈsu pərˌdʒaɪ ənt)

n.
a very bright, very large star, hundreds of times larger than the sun.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

su·per·gi·ant

(so͞o′pər-jī′ənt)
A star that is larger, brighter, and more massive than a giant star. Supergiants, such as Betelgeuse or Rigel, are thousands of times brighter than the sun. See more at star.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supergiant - an extremely bright star of very large diameter and low density
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
That it was a type of star known as a blue-white supergiant. That it was much hotter, tens of times larger, and tens of thousands of times brighter than our Sun.
Rigel is a hot blue-white supergiant that's been shining for less than 100 million years.
It is nearer the end of its life than the blue-white supergiant, Rigel, whose surface temperature is nearer 20,000[bar]C.