Bode's law


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Bode's law

(bəʊdz)
n
(Astronomy) astronomy an empirical rule relating the distances of the planets from the sun, based on the numerical sequence 0, 3, 6, 12, 24,…. Adding 4 to each number and dividing by 10 gives the sequence 0.4, 0.7, 1, 1.6, 2.8,…, which is a reasonable representation of distances in astronomical units for most planets if the minor planets are counted as a single entity at 2.8
[named after Johann Elert Bode (1747–1826), who in 1772 published the law, formulated by Johann Titius in 1766]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
For example Bode's Law is presented on p.116 as a description of the systematic progression of planetary orbital radii outwards from the Sun, but there is no discussion of how this relates to modern theories of orbital migration, or to the observed orbits of exoplanetary systems.
Bode and is know today as Bode's Law. Consider the sequence: 0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 2.4 ...
The theory is called Bode's Law, or the Titius-Bode Law, named after Johann Daniel Titius and Johann Elert Bode in 1766.
Bode's law did predict a planet in the asteroid belt for reasons still not understood, but Bode did not observe it.
A few months later, the discovery was published in a book by the somewhat better known German astronomer Johann Elert Bode, and it came to be called Bode's law. It is now more appropriately called the Titius-Bode law.
Six years later, the German astronomer Johann Elert Bode (1747-1826) popularized that series, which came to be known as Bode's law.
Here, the two mathematical astronomers had to lean uncomfortably on the semi-empirical Bode's Law, a rather dodgy formula just a shade away from numerology, which had somehow worked for the first seven planets and the asteroid belt (see "Bode's Law," page 34).