body horror


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body horror

n
(Film) a horror film genre in which the main feature is the graphically depicted destruction or degeneration of a human body or bodies
References in periodicals archive ?
Aliya Whiteley's The Beauty is just the thing for readers who prefer maximum weirdness and body horror in their books.
On film, identical twins offer a tangible externalisation of that first misapprehension of self, in fact, twins have long been a powerful device for exploring disquieting generic tropes, from the body horror of Dead Ringers (David Cronenberg, 1988) to the psychological horror of Goodnight Mommy (Severin Fiala & Veronika Franz, 2014).
Scott even offers up a grisly new rendition of the infamous sequence which is an effective and full-on piece of body horror, though it's impossible to match the surprise of Hurt's.
Body Horror is an incredible, touching, intelligent collection that looks beyond what's comfortable to examine what is true.
It felt a bit strange to see this work from 1991, given the "spandex craze" that has preoccupied contemporary art in recent years: Filtered through Cronenbergian body horror and DIS magazine aesthetics, yoga pants have come to symbolize the arrival of our cyborg selves, and bottled water the obvious fact of our posthumanism.
Among his topics are the horror before film, vampires, aliens from outer space and the paranoid horror, demonic possessions, ghost hunting and the paranormal, body horror, and psychiatry and horror.
Its enthusiastic indulgence in body horror appears to wink at bloodless art house treatments of these themes while embracing comedies that revel in shock value for its own sake -- take "Sausage Party," which is unlikely to open in local cinemas soon.
Aldana Reyes tries here to pin down the meaning of this label by pointing out that body horror deals mainly with the "estrangement from one's own body" (54) as a possible "form of corporeal transcendence" (56).
Indeed, Carrie, King's first published novel, belonged to much the same tradition, and the somewhat-notorious film version is a tale of high school torment, body horror and bloody psychic retribution.
The sub-genre of body horror, for example, allows feminist filmmakers to examine the female body as a site of both vulnerability and power.
TUSK (18) Electric Cinema CULT director Kevin Smith (Chasing Amy/Jay and Silent Bob) returns with a mixture of comedy and terror in this slacker twist on the body horror genre.
Politically incorrect, lowest-common-denominator comedy and body horror humor can be sublime when the timing is sharp and the staging inspired.