body snatcher

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body snatcher

n.
1. A person who steals corpses from graves and sells them, usually for purposes of dissection.
2. Slang A corporate recruiter.

bod′y·snatch′ing (bŏd′ē-snăch′ĭng) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

body snatcher

n
(Professions) (formerly) a person who robbed graves and sold the corpses for dissection
body snatching n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bod′y snatch`er


n.
a person who steals corpses from graves, esp. to use them for dissection.
[1805–15]
bod′y snatch`ing, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.body snatcher - someone who takes bodies from graves and sells them for anatomical dissectionbody snatcher - someone who takes bodies from graves and sells them for anatomical dissection
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Resurrectionism or body-snatching was carried out in old Newcastle
In the 19th century people had all sorts of beliefs which seem bizarre to us now, including the idea that body-snatching was a respectable trade.
Incredibles 2 is a bit more confused, though the emphasis again is on striving for excellence: the villain is a body-snatching type called Screenslaver who uses screens -- TVs, computers -- to hypnotise people, a dig at the passive consumerism of modern life ("Screens are everywhere.
Imeris thought she could prove her worth during a mission to kill a body-snatching sorceress, but fails disastrously.
The body is an important source of metaphor of many different kinds of ordered systems, including houses, boats, and social groups, and of the cosmos on Halmahera, and thus the body-snatching of witches must be read in that context.
As DCI Barnaby, DS Nelson and new Forensic Pathologist Kam Karimore investigate the mysterious crime, they find themselves drawn into a macabre world of body-snatching during their quest to identify the perpetrator.
Denied entry into heaven or the purging of purgatory, it wandered, tormented endlessly by more powerful spirits, until it hardened into something different: a body-snatching horror called a dybbuk.
Mokhtar cites similar body-snatching cases, including that of 74-year-old Gan Eng Gor.
'True Dons' fans heading up the M1 today are sure to feel lingering bitterness towards their hosts - but it would be sweet if they could upset their body-snatching club.
Still strongly connected, Lela is determined to join her friend, keep her safe from the body-snatching Mazikin, and escape to the peaceful afterlife of Countryside.
He analyzes stories of zombies, vampires, body-snatching, ritual-murder, organ-theft and other horrors as symbolic expressions of body integrity fears that inhere in a society in which individual survival requires the selling of one's life energies on the market.
The Skulduggery book includes an invasive force of body-snatching nasties bound to captivate young minds and turn them into page-turning compulsives; Red Fox, 5.99 [pounds sterling], 978 1 862 30742 1; HarperCollins, 6.99 [pounds sterling], 978 0 00 732601 3.