boffin

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bof·fin

 (bŏf′ĭn)
n. Chiefly British Slang
A scientist, especially one engaged in research.

[Origin unknown.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

boffin

(ˈbɒfɪn)
n
1. informal Brit a scientist, esp one carrying out military research
2. a person who has extensive skill or knowledge in a particular field: a Treasury boffin.
3. informal someone who is considered to be very clever, often to the exclusion of all non-academic interests
[C20: of uncertain origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bof•fin

(ˈbɒf ɪn)

n.
Brit. Slang. a technical expert.
[1940–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boffin - (British slang) a scientist or technician engaged in military research
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
investigator, research worker, researcher - a scientist who devotes himself to doing research
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

boffin

noun (Brit. informal) expert, authority, brain(s) (informal), intellectual, genius, guru, inventor, thinker, wizard, mastermind, intellect, rocket scientist (informal, chiefly U.S.), egghead, wonk (informal), brainbox, bluestocking (usually disparaging), maven (U.S.) fundi (S. African) a bumbling computer boffin
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

boffin

[ˈbɒfɪn] N (Brit) → cerebrito mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

boffin

[ˈbɒfɪn] n (British)expert m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

boffin

n (Brit inf) → Eierkopf m (inf), → Egghead m (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

boffin

[ˈbɒfɪn] n (Brit) (fam) → scienziato/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
'But there's another chance for you,' said Mr Boffin, smiling still,
'Now, Wegg,' said Mr Boffin, hugging his stick closer, 'I want to make a sort of offer to you.
Here was him as it might be, and here was myself as it might be, and there was you, Mr Boffin, as you identically are, with your self-same stick under your very same arm, and your very same back towards us.
(This, not to release any little advantage he might derive from Mr Boffin's avowal.)
'Well,' repeated Boffin, 'I was a listening to you and to him.
'Lard!' exclaimed Mr Boffin, in a tone of great enjoyment, as he settled himself down, still nursing his stick like a baby, 'it's a pleasant place, this!
'If I am not mistaken, sir,' Mr Wegg delicately hinted, resting a hand on his stall, and bending over the discursive Boffin, 'you alluded to some offer or another that was in your mind?'
'Why, you know every one of these songs by name and by tune, and if you want to read or to sing any one on 'em off straight, you've only to whip on your spectacles and do it!' cried Mr Boffin.
'"A literary man--WITH a wooden leg--and all Print is open to him!" That's what I thought to myself, that morning,' pursued Mr Boffin, leaning forward to describe, uncramped by the clotheshorse, as large an arc as his right arm could make; '"all Print is open to him!" And it is, ain't it?'
'It's something,' answered Mr Boffin, 'but I'll take my oath it ain't much.'
'I don't,' said Boffin, in a free-handed manner, 'want to tie a literary man--WITH a wooden leg--down too tight.
Pointing to this result as a large and satisfactory one, Mr Boffin smeared it out with his moistened glove, and sat down on the remains.