bogong


Also found in: Wikipedia.

bogong

(ˈbəʊˌɡɒŋ) or

bugong

n
(Animals) an edible dark-coloured Australian noctuid moth, Agrotis infusa
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
John Blay, the author, with the help of others spent years rediscovering the route along which Indigenous Australians attended Bogong moth ceremonies in the high country and whale gatherings at Twofold Bay.
Within Victoria, the Alpine She-oak Skink has been recorded from (north-to-south) the Bogong High Plains and Falls Creek Alpine Resort, Mt Hotham to Mt Loch and Mt Higginbotham, and on the Lankey and Omeo Plains in the broader Dargo High Plains (Schulz et al.
Patterns of air temperature and accumulation of snow in subalpine heathlands and grasslands on the Bogong High Plains, Victoria.
Zhu, "Du Zihou 'Buyue' shi shi wen Lu Bogong fu hou shuri fu ci".
The Wiradjuri people of the New South Wales highlands once feasted on migrating bogong moths every spring.
The detail and interest in this book just gets better and better as you delve into the world of bush tucker bugs, sweet bush foods, edible bugs and grubs, nutritional analysis of caterpillars, feasting on bogong moths, tasty hoppers, locusts and crickets.
However, Thompson's source is not Lingard 1846 but a misinterpreted passage attributed to Lingard 1846 in 'Mallacoota Memories', a Mallacoota and District Historical Society publication (1980:23) (1) which reads, 'The Genore River was followed by the Biduelli tribe--"scrub dwellers" = on their annual treck [sic] to the Monaro each Spring, hunting for a type of yam and the Bogong moth larvae'.
A study of the ecology of the adult bogong moth, Agrotis infusa (Boisd.
He saw the deserted bark huts which the Aborigines had temporarily erected when collecting the bogong moths for their feasts.
The special importance of the local tutelary or earth god (Tudi Gong [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) cult in Hakka communities is shown by the extraordinary number of Bogong [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] shrines dotted all over the land and among the settlements.
The animals include: 1 wonderful wombat, 5 brilliant bilbies, 7 keen kangaroos through to the very unexpected 18 ripper red-back spiders and l 9 bonza bogong moths etc.
Beaton took support from Sullivan's arguments for Bunya Nut (Araucaria bidwillii) feasts in southeast Queensland (Sullivan 1977:60) and Flood's (1976:40-44) arguments for ceremonies supported by annual migrations of Bogong Moths (Agrotis infusa) in the southeastern Highlands (Beaton 1977).