Boiardo


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Boiardo

(Italian boˈjardo)
n
(Biography) Matteo Maria (matˈtɛːo maˈria), conte de Scandiano. 1434–94, Italian poet; author of the historical epic Orlando Innamorato (1487)

Bo•iar•do

(bɔɪˈɑr doʊ)

n.
Matteo Maria, 1434–94, Italian poet.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
"I know his worship," said the curate; "that is where Senor Reinaldos of Montalvan figures with his friends and comrades, greater thieves than Cacus, and the Twelve Peers of France with the veracious historian Turpin; however, I am not for condemning them to more than perpetual banishment, because, at any rate, they have some share in the invention of the famous Matteo Boiardo, whence too the Christian poet Ludovico Ariosto wove his web, to whom, if I find him here, and speaking any language but his own, I shall show no respect whatever; but if he speaks his own tongue I will put him upon my head."
Jo Ann Cavallo and Corrado Confalonieri (eds.), Boiardo, Edizioni Unicopli: Milan, 2018; 280 pp.: 9788840019826, [euro]18.00 (PBK)
The Romance Epics of Boiardo, Ariosto, and Tasso: From Public Duty to Private Pleasure.
Basta que se considere a atitude extremamente viril da maior parte das heroinas epicas, sobretudo das de Boiardo e de Ariosto, para saber que se tratava de um ideal bem definido.
Una vez que ambos se retiran a un pequeno y estrecho valle para que Flora recite alguna de sus traducciones acompanada de su arpa, el narrador explicita como Edward nunca, ni en sus suenos mas disparatados, habia sido capaz de imaginar una belleza tal, similar a una "fair enchantress of Boiardo or Ariosto" (1.22: 106).
Though informing Commedia dell'Arte scenarios, this tradition with its proactive female characters remains unheralded here, as do Venetian multilingual theatre, the work of Henry and Renee Kahane, and the tradition of comic-epic elaborations of the Charlemagne cycle in northern courts (Boiardo, Pulci, Ariosto).
Early Modern Italian literature was treated again in "The Rinaldo of Torquato Tasso" (July 1883) and "Stories from Boiardo" (September 1885).
(1) Later in the century the humanist poet Matteo Maria Boiardo would open his Orlando Innamorato with the reflection that those in power have the tendency to crave what they cannot have, often putting their realms in danger in a vain attempt to secure something beyond their reach:
En Italia, siguen el ritmo de sus octavas Pulci, Boiardo, Ariosto y Tasso.
It is a precision surgery where equal flexion-extension spacing should be achieved to allow joint stability throughout the range of motion (Laskin, 1981; Dorr & Boiardo, 1986).
In the Godfather Garden: The Long Life and Times of Richie "the Boot" Boiardo. By Richard Linnett.