Boileau-Despréaux

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Boi·leau-Des·pré·aux

 (bwä-lō′dĕ-prā-ō′), Nicolas 1636-1711.
French critic and poet whose Art of Poetry (1674), a treatise in verse, is a summation of the rules and conventions in French literature.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Boi•leau-Des•pré•aux

(bwɑˈloʊ dəˈpreɪ oʊ)

n.
Nicolas, 1636–1711, French critic and poet.
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The attacks centered on Italian literature's general "bad taste" and its absence of the leading classical ideals of truth, wit and pure imitation of nature as set forth by Nicolas Boileau-Despreaux (1636-1711) and his 1674 L'Art poetique; Rene Rapin (1621-1687) and his 1674 Reflexions sur la poetique; and Dominique Bouhours (1628-1702) and his 1671 Entretiens d'Ariste et d'Eugene and his 1687 La Maniere de bien penser dans les ouvrages d'esprit.
Nicolas Boileau-Despreaux was perhaps the most notable critic of the period.
Irritated by Perrault's assertions, the poet and satirist Nicolas Boileau-Despreaux rose to object to the reading, but the erudit Peirre-Daniel Huet interrupted Boileau's protest, stating flatly, "Monsieur Despreaux, it seems to me this concerns us more than you" (161-162).
As for the patient experiencing a level of satisfaction that she is comfortable with when her health care provider may be tired or under stress, I suggest that patient consider a quote by Nicolas Boileau-Despreaux: "Greatest fools are oft most satisfied."
As for the patient experiencing a level of satisfaction that she is comfortable with when her health care provider may be tired or under stress, I suggest the patient consider a quote by Nicolas Boileau-Despreaux: "Greatest fools are oft most satisfied."
French poet Nicholas Boileau-Despreaux (1636-1711) once penned, "Every age has its pleasures, its style of wit, and its own ways." Henry David Thoreau worded a similar thought in his diary on November 11, 1854: "That man is the richest whose pleasures are the cheapest." A couple of decades later, celebrated British writer Rudyard Kipling challenged mankind with these words: "Teach us to delight in simple things." Any of these quotes would have been keen advertising slogans for Biloxi's Riviera Hotel, admired for generations as the pride of the city.
Boileau, Nicolasalso known as Boileau-Despreaux (b.
His chief opponent in the controversy was Nicolas Boileau-Despreaux, who on the whole had the better of the argument.