Bologna sausage


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bologna sausage

n
(Cookery) chiefly US and Canadian a large smoked sausage made of seasoned mixed meats. Also called: baloney, boloney or polony (esp Brit)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bologna sausage - large smooth-textured smoked sausage of beef and veal and pork
sausage - highly seasoned minced meat stuffed in casings
polony - another name for Bologna sausage
References in classic literature ?
In reality, true nature is as difficult to be met with in authors, as the Bayonne ham, or Bologna sausage, is to be found in the shops.
To emphasize his remarks, he pulled out a gold-sack the size of a bologna sausage and thumped it down on the bar.
So saying, he slammed a sack of gold dust of the size of a bologna sausage down upon the bar.
Those who were still older, and could reach the tables, marched about munching contentedly at meat bones and bologna sausages.
So, bit by bit, the feast takes form--there is a ham and a dish of sauerkraut, boiled rice, macaroni, bologna sausages, great piles of penny buns, bowls of milk, and foaming pitchers of beer.
In addition, variations in fat and moisture content did not appear to have any effect on the pH of bologna sausage (Carballo et al.
1997) focusing on bologna sausage with added wheat bran insoluble dietary fiber in wheat bran had the ability to bind water and fat in the meat matrix causing an increased cooking yield of the product.
Despite this trend, there are no studies regarding the development of smoked bologna sausage manufactured from MF with dietary fiber and on its stability during refrigerated storage.
There was a selection of fresh lobsters, potted shrimps, soused herrings, sardines, roast beef, round of spiced beef, virginia and cumberland ham, bologna sausage, brawn, corned ox tongue, lettuce, and tongue from the buffet.
A method of cutting off three-inch pieces from a beam of light, like a meat cutter slicing a bologna sausage, though the light moves at 186,000 miles a second, is described by Dr.
To this mystique an element of spurious glamour was added by travellers who exaggerated their own reckless daring in penetrating a mosque: Grelot boasted of refreshing himself with a bottle of wine and a Bologna sausage while taking drawings of the interior of the mosque of Santa Sophia, and the Prince de Ligne claimed to have bribed his way into a mosque and forced a Moslem to eat pork there.
Hislop took their case up and representing it to Commissioner McCreary, each man was shortly after supplied with a loaf of bread and bologna sausage.