absolute magnitude

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absolute magnitude

n.
The intrinsic brightness of a celestial body, measured in magnitudes, computed as if viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs, or 32.6 light years.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

absolute magnitude

n
(Astronomy) the apparent magnitude a given star would have if it were situated at a distance of 10 parsecs (32.6 light years) from the earth
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ab′solute mag′nitude


n.
the magnitude of a star as it would appear to a hypothetical observer at a distance of 10 parsecs or 32.6 light-years.
[1900–05]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

absolute magnitude

A star’s size when seen from a distance of 10 parsecs.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.absolute magnitude - (astronomy) the magnitude that a star would have if it were viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32.62 light years) from the earthabsolute magnitude - (astronomy) the magnitude that a star would have if it were viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32.62 light years) from the earth
magnitude - the property of relative size or extent (whether large or small); "they tried to predict the magnitude of the explosion"; "about the magnitude of a small pea"
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The answer is called the bolometric magnitude, [m.sub.bol], because total radiation was once measured with a device called a bolometer.
Handbook subjects run from notes on collimating telescopes and choosing film for astrophotography to explanations of interstellar extinction and bolometric magnitudes. The preface says that the text has been "thoroughly revised and brought up to date," but I found that revisions were not so wholesale.