Bolshevik

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Related to Bolsheviks: Mensheviks, Bolshevik Revolution

Bol·she·vik

 (bōl′shə-vĭk′, bŏl′-)
n. pl. Bol·she·viks or Bol·she·vi·ki (-vē′kē)
1.
a. A member of the left-wing majority group of the Russian Social Democratic Workers' Party that adopted Lenin's theses on party organization in 1903.
b. A member of the Russian Social Democratic Workers' Party that seized power in that country in November 1917.
c. A member of a Marxist-Leninist party or a supporter of one; a Communist.
2. often bolshevik An extreme radical: a literary bolshevik. In all senses also called Bolshevist.

[Russian Bol'shevik, from bol'she, comparative of bol'shoĭ, large; see bel- in Indo-European roots.]

Bol′she·vik′ adj.
Word History: The word Bolshevik derives from the Russian word bol'she, "bigger, more," the comparative form of bol'shoĭ, "big." In Russian, the plural Bol'sheviki was the name given to the majority faction at the Second Congress of the Russian Social Democratic Workers' Party in 1903. The smaller faction was known as Men'sheviki, from men'she, "less, smaller," the comparative of malyĭ, "little, few." The Bol'sheviki, who sided with Lenin in the split that followed the Congress, subsequently became the Russian Communist Party. In 1952 the word Bol'shevik was dropped as an official term in the Soviet Union, but it had long since passed into other languages, including English.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bolshevik

(ˈbɒlʃɪvɪk)
n, pl -viks or -viki (-ˈviːkɪ)
1. (Sociology) (formerly) a Russian Communist. Compare Menshevik
2. (Historical Terms) any Communist
3. (often not capital) jocular derogatory any political radical, esp a revolutionary
[C20: from Russian Bol'shevik majority, from bol'shoi great; from the fact that this group formed a majority of the Russian Social Democratic Party in 1903]
ˈBolsheˌvism n
ˈBolshevist adj, n
ˌBolsheˈvistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bol•she•vik

(ˈboʊl ʃə vɪk, -ˌvik, ˈbɒl-)

n., pl. -viks, -vik•i (-ˌvɪk i, -ˌvi ki)
1.
a. a member of the radical majority wing of the Russian Social-Democratic Workers' Party, 1903–17, advocating abrupt, forceful seizure of power by the proletariat.
b. (after 1918) a member of the Russian Communist Party.
2. a member of any Communist Party.
3. (often l.c.) Older Use: Disparaging. a political radical or revolutionary.
[1915–20; < Russian bol'shevík, derivative of ból'sh(iĭ) larger, greater]
Bol′she•vism (-ˌvɪz əm) n.
Bol′she•vist, n., adj.
Bol`she•vis′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bolshevik - emotionally charged terms used to refer to extreme radicals or revolutionariesBolshevik - emotionally charged terms used to refer to extreme radicals or revolutionaries
radical - a person who has radical ideas or opinions
2.Bolshevik - a Russian member of the left-wing majority group that followed Lenin and eventually became the Russian communist partyBolshevik - a Russian member of the left-wing majority group that followed Lenin and eventually became the Russian communist party
commie, communist - a socialist who advocates communism
Adj.1.Bolshevik - of or relating to Bolshevism; "Bolshevik Revolution"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Bolshevik

[ˈbɒlʃəvɪk]
A. ADJbolchevique
B. Nbolchevique mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Bolshevik

[ˈbɒlʃɪvɪk]
adj [revolution, party, regime] → bolchevique
n (= person) → Bolchevik mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Bolshevik

nBolschewik m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Bolshevik

[ˈbɒlʃəvɪk] adj & nbolscevico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
After some Jews became Bolsheviks, Europe's deep-rooted and longstanding anti-Judaism reappeared through the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism, which updated timeworn anti-Jewish stereotypes while associating Jews with Russian Bolshevism.
This book makes a vital contribution to our understanding of how the revolutionary events unfolded for common citizens, who by implication from Hasegawa's conclusion would have accepted the new regime at least perfunctorily because of the extent to which the Bolsheviks reestablished a fundamental order.
Thus, Azerbaijan gained independence and the domination of Armenians and Bolsheviks in Baku and surrounding areas came to an end.
During the Russian Revolution, the Bolsheviks, led by leftist revolutionary Vladimir Lenin seized power and destroyed the tradition of czarist rule.
Whereas the Nazis lashed out at external enemies, most of all the Jews, the Bolsheviks attacked the enemy within, the self that refused to adhere completely to the godlike thinking of Lenin or Stalin.
To begin, let us note that the Bolsheviks who led the 'October Revolution' never saw it as a crucial event in just Russian history.
Later, these same ideas would be admired by and implemented by the Bolsheviks. If someone sees a white horse with a black spot on its side run into the woods, then observes a white horse with a black spot on its side emerge a few minutes later, one can safely presume it is the same horse.
Summary: From St Petersburg to Santiago, Kolkata to Havana, the Bolsheviks shook the intelligentsia and the commoner alike like never before
This reference guide on the Russian Revolution of 1917 contains essays and primary documents on the 1905 and 1917 revolutions and the Russian Civil War, and encyclopedia entries on key events and figures, to connect the events of 1905 to 1917, the impact of World War I, the Provisional Government, the Bolsheviks, and the anti-Bolshevik forces that fought in the Russian Civil War.
Arrested by the police in January 1904 for his underground work, he landed in prison where he met Bolsheviks; largely under their influence, he identified himself as a Bolshevik by the end of 1905.
With surprisingly little resistance, the demonstrators took the Winter Palace, the czar abdicated, and a provisional government was fashioned from a panoply of political parties, including socialists previously aligned with the Bolsheviks. The parties of the Provisional Government agreed to a national election of representatives to a constituent assembly, whose task it would be to draft a constitution to govern a postczarist Russia.