Bonaparte


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Related to Bonaparte: Napoleon Bonaparte

Bo·na·parte

 (bō′nə-pärt′)
Corsican family, all brothers of Napoleon I, including Joseph (1768-1844), king of Naples (1806-1808) and Spain (1808-1813); Lucien (1775-1840), who disapproved of Napoleon's policies; Louis (1778-1846), who was king of Holland (1806-1810) and fought with Napoleon in Italy (1796-1797) and Egypt (1798-1799); and Jérôme (1784-1860), who was king of Westphalia (1807-1813), fought at Waterloo (1815), became marshal of France (1850), and was president of the senate under Napoleon III.

Bonaparte

(ˈbəʊnəˌpɑːt; French bɔnapart)
n
1. (Biography) See Napoleon I
2. (Biography) Jérôme (ʒerom), brother of Napoleon I. 1784–1860, king of Westphalia (1807–13)
3. (Biography) Joseph (ʒozɛf), brother of Napoleon I. 1768–1844, king of Naples (1806–08) and of Spain (1808–13)
4. (Biography) Louis (lwi), brother of Napoleon I. 1778–1846, king of Holland (1806–10)
5. (Biography) Lucien (lysjɛ̃), brother of Napoleon I. 1775–1840, prince of Canino

Bo•na•parte

(ˈboʊ nəˌpɑrt)

n.
1. Charles Louis Napoléon, Napoleon III.
2. François Charles Joseph, Napoleon II.
3. Jérôme, 1784–1860, king of Westphalia 1807 (brother of Napoleon I).
4. Joseph, 1768–1844, king of Naples 1806–08; king of Spain 1808–13 (brother of Napoleon I).
5. Louis, 1778–1846, king of Holland 1806–10 (brother of Napoleon I).
6. Lucien, 1775–1840, prince of Canino, a principality in Italy (brother of Napoleon I).
7. Napoléon, Napoleon I.
Italian, Buonaparte.
Bo`na•par′te•an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bonaparte - French general who became emperor of the French (1769-1821)Bonaparte - French general who became emperor of the French (1769-1821)
References in classic literature ?
"Let Bonaparte know that Bartolomeo di Piombo wishes to speak with him," said the Italian to the captain on duty.
In vain the officer represented to Bartolomeo that he could not see the First Consul without having previously requested an audience in writing; the Italian insisted that the soldier should go to Bonaparte. The officer stated the rules of the post, and refused to comply with the order of this singular visitor.
Bonaparte then spoke to him sharply, and the aide-de-camp, with evident unwillingness, left the room.
"Do you mean to betray me?" cried Bartolomeo, with a darkling look at Bonaparte. "Do you know that there are still four Piombos in Corsica?"
'The Portas have dealt me this blow,' I said; and, forthwith, I went to the woods, and there I called together all the men whom I had ever served, --do you hear me, Bonaparte?--and we marched to the vineyard of the Portas.
Bonaparte looked with curiosity at Bartolomeo, but without surprise.
"Without me, your mother would never have reached Marseille," he said, addressing himself to Bonaparte, who was silent and thoughtful, his elbow resting on a mantel-shelf.
"But I can shut my eyes," continued Bonaparte. "The tradition of the Vendetta will long prevent the reign of law in Corsica," he added, as if speaking to himself.
Bonaparte was silent for a few moments, and Lucien made a sign to Piombo not to speak.
de Bonaparte; do not conceal anything, however serious, -- let us see, the Island of Elba is a volcano, and we may expect to have issuing thence flaming and bristling war -- bella, horrida bella." M.
If Bonaparte landed at Naples, the whole coalition would be on foot before he could even reach Piomoino; if he land in Tuscany, he will be in an unfriendly territory; if he land in France, it must be with a handful of men, and the result of that is easily foretold, execrated as he is by the population.
It was an anecdote, then current, to the effect that the Duc d'Enghien had gone secretly to Paris to visit Mademoiselle George; that at her house he came upon Bonaparte, who also enjoyed the famous actress' favors, and that in his presence Napoleon happened to fall into one of the fainting fits to which he was subject, and was thus at the duc's mercy.