Bonapartism


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Related to Bonapartism: Caesarism

Bo·na·part·ist

 (bō′nə-pär′tĭst)
n.
A follower or supporter of Napoleon I and his policies and dynastic claims or of the Bonaparte family.

Bo′na·part′ism n.

Bonapartism

(ˈbəʊnəpɑːˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political system resembling the rules of the Bonapartes, esp Napoleon I and Napoleon III: centralized government by a military dictator, who enjoys popular support given expression in plebiscites
2. (Historical Terms) (esp in France) support for the government or dynasty of Napoleon Bonaparte
ˈBonaˌpartist n

Bonapartism

1. support of the actions and doctrines of Napoleon Bonaparte.
2. the desire for a leader to emulate Napoleon Bonaparte. — Bonapartist, n.
See also: Politics
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References in classic literature ?
Villefort, as we have seen, belonged to the aristocratic party at Marseilles, Morrel to the plebeian; the first was a royalist, the other suspected of Bonapartism. Villefort looked disdainfully at Morrel, and replied, --
Before long Mademoiselle Thirion made known that she thought it improper to attend the classes of a painter whose opinions were tainted with patriotism and Bonapartism (in those days the terms were synonymous), and she ceased her attendance at the studio.
The radicalism inspired by the French Revolution at the end of the 18th century had been crushed from without by its usurpation by Bonapartism and from within by brutal repression.
As anyone remotely familiar with French history knows, the competing forces of revolution and Bonapartism have long driven political outcomes.
In his message on the 41st anniversary of the military coup, Asif Ali Zardari said, 'We denounce dictatorship; we also resolve to banish bonapartism and never allow it to rear its ugly head'.
Fifty years after the American Revolution, we were building a democracy, while the French had retreated to Bonapartism and monarchy.
Buruma engages in the history of Western ideas, comparing prewar emperor worship in Japan to 'a kind of Bonapartism grafted onto Japanese traditions.'
(63.) Lamy actually declared the battleship a symbol of Bonapartism unsuitable for a republic, and the smaller crews of the torpedo boats more representative of the democratic ideal.
In the first case, populism bears the traces of Marx's idea of Bonapartism and Gramsci's Caesarism, referring to great leaders who arrive to resolve a general crisis in the name of the people, the true source of sovereignty.
As Streeck writes, 'since a capitalist society under Bonapartism lacks the power to control, or contain, market forces, capitalists can afford to let their Bonaparte stage spectacles of political bravado; behind the scenes, markets do what markets do'.
The classic example of this is the discussion by Marx (26) about the Bonapartism of the years 1840-1850 in France, at the moment of implosion of the political system and crisis in the relationship in the French Parliament between the representatives and those represented.