Bonaparte

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Bo·na·parte

 (bō′nə-pärt′)
Corsican family, all brothers of Napoleon I, including Joseph (1768-1844), king of Naples (1806-1808) and Spain (1808-1813); Lucien (1775-1840), who disapproved of Napoleon's policies; Louis (1778-1846), who was king of Holland (1806-1810) and fought with Napoleon in Italy (1796-1797) and Egypt (1798-1799); and Jérôme (1784-1860), who was king of Westphalia (1807-1813), fought at Waterloo (1815), became marshal of France (1850), and was president of the senate under Napoleon III.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bonaparte

(ˈbəʊnəˌpɑːt; French bɔnapart)
n
1. (Biography) See Napoleon I
2. (Biography) Jérôme (ʒerom), brother of Napoleon I. 1784–1860, king of Westphalia (1807–13)
3. (Biography) Joseph (ʒozɛf), brother of Napoleon I. 1768–1844, king of Naples (1806–08) and of Spain (1808–13)
4. (Biography) Louis (lwi), brother of Napoleon I. 1778–1846, king of Holland (1806–10)
5. (Biography) Lucien (lysjɛ̃), brother of Napoleon I. 1775–1840, prince of Canino
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bo•na•parte

(ˈboʊ nəˌpɑrt)

n.
1. Charles Louis Napoléon, Napoleon III.
2. François Charles Joseph, Napoleon II.
3. Jérôme, 1784–1860, king of Westphalia 1807 (brother of Napoleon I).
4. Joseph, 1768–1844, king of Naples 1806–08; king of Spain 1808–13 (brother of Napoleon I).
5. Louis, 1778–1846, king of Holland 1806–10 (brother of Napoleon I).
6. Lucien, 1775–1840, prince of Canino, a principality in Italy (brother of Napoleon I).
7. Napoléon, Napoleon I.
Italian, Buonaparte.
Bo`na•par′te•an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bonaparte - French general who became emperor of the French (1769-1821)Bonaparte - French general who became emperor of the French (1769-1821)
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References in classic literature ?
It would be difficult to give an idea of the exaggerations prevalent at this epoch, and of the horror inspired by the Bonapartists. However insignificant and petty Amelie's action may now seem to be, it was at that time a very natural expression of the prevailing hatred.
The aristocracy of the studio had for some days past resolved upon the fall of this queen, but no one had, as yet, ventured to openly avoid the Bonapartist. Mademoiselle Thirion's act was, therefore, a decisive stroke, intended by her to force the others into becoming, openly, the accomplices of her hatred.
"Well, then, I should say, for instance," resumed Danglars, "that if after a voyage such as Dantes has just made, in which he touched at the Island of Elba, some one were to denounce him to the king's procureur as a Bonapartist agent" --
"The honorable, the king's attorney, is informed by a friend of the throne and religion, that one Edmond Dantes, mate of the ship Pharaon, arrived this morning from Smyrna, after having touched at Naples and Porto-Ferrajo, has been intrusted by Murat with a letter for the usurper, and by the usurper with a letter for the Bonapartist committee in Paris.
all the soldiers who thus returned were either too old or too young; too aggressively Bonapartist, or too dissipated; in short, their several situations were out of keeping with the rank, fortune, and morals of Mademoiselle Cormon, who now grew daily more and more desperate.
"You will be called a Bonapartist! Please do not meddle in the matter, sir.
These are the nuclear Bonapartists or what Ken Booth called Neo Clauswitzians.
Just three years back, the bravery with which the people of Turkey faced military tanks on the streets when a coup attempt was made should be an eye opener for all Bonapartists.
Historically since Tudor times it resisted every attempt to unify the continent, whether by Habsburgs, Bourbons, Bonapartists or fascists.
Cromwellian Independents, Robespierrist Jacobins, and Leninist Bolsheviks, that is to say, made way for 'Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverians,' Bonapartists, and Stalinists." (34) This succeeds in upgrading the importance of "second" revolutions.
Leading Bonapartes and Bonapartists, such as half-brother of the Emperor, the due de Morny, as well as Princesse Mathilde and Plon-Plon, ploughed their fortunes into building up private galleries (and armouries in the case of Nieuwerkerke).
The uprising was enthusiastically welcomed by Bonapartists, Republicans, and Liberals, as well as by all those who looked forward to great changes in the world, as prophesied by historiosophers.