indenture

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Related to Bond indenture: Serial bonds, sinking fund bond

in·den·ture

 (ĭn-dĕn′chər)
n.
1. often indentures A contract binding one party into the service of another for a specified term.
2.
a. A deed executed by more than one party.
b. An instrument or agreement specifying the terms of a bond or trust.
3. A document separated into portions so as to create indentations that allow the holders of the separate portions to match up in order to confirm authenticity.
tr.v. in·den·tured, in·den·tur·ing, in·den·tures
To bind into the service of another by indenture.

[Middle English endenture, a written agreement, from Anglo-Norman, from endenter, to indent (from the matching notches on multiple copies of the documents); see indent1.]

indenture

(ɪnˈdɛntʃə)
n
1. (Law) any deed, contract, or sealed agreement between two or more parties
2. (Law) (formerly) a deed drawn up in duplicate, each part having correspondingly indented edges for identification and security
3. (Commerce) (often plural) a contract between an apprentice and his master
4. a formal or official list or certificate authenticated for use as a voucher, etc
5. a less common word for indentation
vb
6. (Law) (intr) to enter into an agreement by indenture
7. (Law) (tr) to bind (an apprentice, servant, etc) by indenture
8. (tr) obsolete to indent or wrinkle
inˈdentureˌship n

in•den•ture

(ɪnˈdɛn tʃər)

n., v. -tured, -tur•ing. n.
1. a deed or agreement executed in two or more copies with edges correspondingly indented.
2. a contract by which a person, as an apprentice, is bound to service.
3. an official or formal document for use as a voucher.
v.t.
5. to bind by indenture, as an apprentice.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Medieval Latin indentūra]
in•den′ture•ship`, n.

indenture


Past participle: indentured
Gerund: indenturing

Imperative
indenture
indenture
Present
I indenture
you indenture
he/she/it indentures
we indenture
you indenture
they indenture
Preterite
I indentured
you indentured
he/she/it indentured
we indentured
you indentured
they indentured
Present Continuous
I am indenturing
you are indenturing
he/she/it is indenturing
we are indenturing
you are indenturing
they are indenturing
Present Perfect
I have indentured
you have indentured
he/she/it has indentured
we have indentured
you have indentured
they have indentured
Past Continuous
I was indenturing
you were indenturing
he/she/it was indenturing
we were indenturing
you were indenturing
they were indenturing
Past Perfect
I had indentured
you had indentured
he/she/it had indentured
we had indentured
you had indentured
they had indentured
Future
I will indenture
you will indenture
he/she/it will indenture
we will indenture
you will indenture
they will indenture
Future Perfect
I will have indentured
you will have indentured
he/she/it will have indentured
we will have indentured
you will have indentured
they will have indentured
Future Continuous
I will be indenturing
you will be indenturing
he/she/it will be indenturing
we will be indenturing
you will be indenturing
they will be indenturing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been indenturing
you have been indenturing
he/she/it has been indenturing
we have been indenturing
you have been indenturing
they have been indenturing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been indenturing
you will have been indenturing
he/she/it will have been indenturing
we will have been indenturing
you will have been indenturing
they will have been indenturing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been indenturing
you had been indenturing
he/she/it had been indenturing
we had been indenturing
you had been indenturing
they had been indenturing
Conditional
I would indenture
you would indenture
he/she/it would indenture
we would indenture
you would indenture
they would indenture
Past Conditional
I would have indentured
you would have indentured
he/she/it would have indentured
we would have indentured
you would have indentured
they would have indentured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indenture - a concave cut into a surface or edge (as in a coastline)indenture - a concave cut into a surface or edge (as in a coastline)
notch - a V-shaped or U-shaped indentation carved or scratched into a surface; "there were four notches in the handle of his revolver"
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
notch - a V-shaped indentation; "mandibular notch"
cleft - a split or indentation in something (as the palate or chin)
2.indenture - formal agreement between the issuer of bonds and the bondholders as to terms of the debt
written agreement - a legal document summarizing the agreement between parties
3.indenture - a contract binding one party into the service of another for a specified term
contract - a binding agreement between two or more persons that is enforceable by law
4.indenture - the space left between the margin and the start of an indented line
blank space, space, place - a blank area; "write your name in the space provided"
Verb1.indenture - bind by or as if by indentures, as of an apprentice or servant; "an indentured servant"
oblige, obligate, bind, hold - bind by an obligation; cause to be indebted; "He's held by a contract"; "I'll hold you by your promise"
Translations

indenture

[ɪnˈdentʃəʳ] N
1. (Comm) → escritura f
2. indenturescontrato m de aprendizaje

indenture

[ɪnˈdɛntʃər] ncontrat m d'emploi-formation

indenture

n
indentures pl (of apprentice)Ausbildungs- or Lehrvertrag m
(Jur) Vertrag in zwei oder mehreren Ausführungen mit bestimmter Kanteneinkerbung zur Identifizierung
vt apprenticein die Lehre nehmen

indenture

[ɪnˈdɛntʃəʳ] ncontratto m formazione inv
References in periodicals archive ?
The minimum threshold for a cross-default is USD50 million, according to the perpetual bond indenture. In Fitch's opinion, this threshold is likely to be reached towards the end of January 2019, when the 30-day cure periods of the next coupon payments expires, amounting to USD60.8 million of its 2022, 2029, 2042, and perpetual senior unsecured notes, which are due throughout December 2018.
know how large of a role path dependency plays in bond indenture
The deal also depends on Westmoreland either amending its existing credit facility and bond indenture or refinancing all of its existing debt and on refinancing of Oxford's current debt.
Pennvest has no plans to issue additional bonds to fund loans under the 1990 bond indenture, Fitch said.
Under terms of the extension, the bond holders and Bond Indenture trustee agreed to extend the waiver of a default arising from the inclusion of a going concern explanatory paragraph in the independent auditor's report on the company's financial statements for 2009, any default arising from the company's failure to comply with the minimum liquidity requirements set forth in the Bond Indenture, and other technical defaults under the Bond Indenture.
The contractual feature of whether or not the bond indenture has an explicit restriction is quantified by using an indicator variable: 1 for explicit restriction and 0 for implicit (i.e.
Singer, 1982, "Bond Indenture Provisions and the Risk of Corporate-Debt", Journal of Financial Economics, 10:375-406
* The company purchases the bonds and pays the proceeds to the Trustee of the Bond Indenture. The company pays for the costs and expenses related to the bond issuance, which is payable out of the bond proceeds.
Recently, bondholders have been actively demanding cash from telecom customers, even though there has been no technical default under the bond indenture agreement.
Because each public bondholder owns only a relatively small fraction of the company's bonds, the incentive to obtain information about the company, to monitor compliance with the bond indenture, and to assess whether and what kind of enforcement action should be taken if a covenant is breached is reduced.
"Valuing Corporate Securities: Some Effects of Bond Indenture Provisions." Journal of Finance, 31(May): 351-368.
Two different rationales may explain why a firm would include ERCs in the bond indenture. On the one hand, ERCs could be effective in protecting bondholders from wealth transfers that may result from debt-financed takeovers and recapitalizations, lowering agency costs of debt.