chemical bond

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chemical bond
top: covalent bonding in a water molecule
center: metallic bonding in silver
bottom: ionic bonding in sodium chloride

chemical bond

n.
Any of several forces, especially the ionic bond, covalent bond, and metallic bond, by which atoms or ions are bound in a molecule or crystal.

chemical bond

n
(Chemistry) a mutual attraction between two atoms resulting from a redistribution of their outer electrons. See also covalent bond, electrovalent bond, coordinate bond
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chemical bond - an electrical force linking atoms
attraction, attractive force - the force by which one object attracts another
covalent bond - a chemical bond that involves sharing a pair of electrons between atoms in a molecule
cross-link, cross-linkage - a side bond that links two adjacent chains of atoms in a complex molecule
hydrogen bond - a chemical bond consisting of a hydrogen atom between two electronegative atoms (e.g., oxygen or nitrogen) with one side be a covalent bond and the other being an ionic bond
electrostatic bond, electrovalent bond, ionic bond - a chemical bond in which one atom loses an electron to form a positive ion and the other atom gains an electron to form a negative ion
metallic bond - a chemical bond in which electrons are shared over many nuclei and electronic conduction occurs
peptide bond, peptide linkage - the primary linkage of all protein structures; the chemical bond between the carboxyl groups and amino groups that unites a peptide
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1950 meeting's report, The Present State of Chemical Structural Theory, contained an elaborate and unashamedly overstated endorsement of Butlerov that connected virtually all important features of modern bonding theory with Butlerov, including quantum mechanics and a diluted version of resonance known as the "theory of mutual influences." (72) In doing so, the report's authors effectively argued that recent advances in structural chemistry should not only be accepted but also that only Soviet science truly understood their full significance.
Within the framework of bonding theory, many researchers have examined the relationship between individuals and their parents during childhood and the mental harmony of those same individuals in adulthood.
Lu, "An interlaminar bonding theory for delamination and nonrigid interface analysis," Journal of Reinforced Plastics and Composites, vol.