bonfire

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bon·fire

 (bŏn′fīr′)
n.
A large fire built outdoors, as for signaling or in celebration of an event.

[Middle English bonnefire : bon, bone; see bone + fir, fire; see fire.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bonfire

(ˈbɒnˌfaɪə)
n
a large outdoor fire
[C15: alteration (through influence of French bon good) of bone-fire; from the use of bones as fuel]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bon•fire

(ˈbɒnˌfaɪər)

n.
a large fire built in the open air, for warmth, entertainment, or as a signal.
[1375–1425; late Middle English bone fire fire with bones for fuel]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bonfire - a large outdoor fire that is lighted as a signal or in celebrationbonfire - a large outdoor fire that is lighted as a signal or in celebration
fire - the event of something burning (often destructive); "they lost everything in the fire"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
نارٌ في الهَواءِ الطَّلْقِنار مَوْقُودة في الهَوَاءِ الطَّلْق
oheňtáborák
bål
kokkorovio
lomača
örömtűz
bál, brenna
大かがり火
모닥불
laužas
ugunskurs
kres
brasa
กองไฟจุดกลางแจ้ง
şenlik ateşiaçık hava ateşihavayi fişek
lửa đốt rác

bonfire

[ˈbɒnfaɪəʳ] N (for celebration) → hoguera f; (for rubbish) → fogata f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bonfire

[ˈbɒnfaɪər] n
(= celebration) → feu m (de joie)
(for rubbish)feu m (de jardin)Bonfire Night n (British)5 novembre m (commémoration de la tentative manquée de Guy Fawkes de faire sauter le Parlement, en 1605)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

bonfire

n (for burning rubbish) → Feuer nt; (as beacon) → Leucht- or Signalfeuer nt; (Guy Fawkes) → Guy-Fawkes-Feuer nt; (for celebration) → Freudenfeuer nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bonfire

[ˈbɒnˌfaɪəʳ] nfalò m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

bonfire

(ˈbonfaiə) noun
a large fire in the open air, often built to celebrate something.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

bonfire

نار مَوْقُودة في الهَوَاءِ الطَّلْق oheň bål (Lager-)Feuer φωτιά hoguera kokko feu de joie lomača falò 大かがり火 모닥불 vuur in de openlucht bål ognisko fogueira костер brasa กองไฟจุดกลางแจ้ง şenlik ateşi lửa đốt rác 篝火
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Behind the guns were their limbers and still farther back picket ropes and artillerymen's bonfires. To the left, not far from the farthest cannon, was a small, newly constructed wattle shed from which came the sound of officers' voices in eager conversation.
Travellers Unhorsed- Pedestrian Preparations- Prying Spies.- Bonfires of Baggage- A March on Foot.- Rafting a River - The Wounded Elk.- Indian Trails.- Willful Conduct of Mr.
Through January and February I went to the river with the Harlings on clear nights, and we skated up to the big island and made bonfires on the frozen sand.
On the evening of the 26th of August, 1765, a bonfire was kindled in King Street.
On that day, there was to be a bonfire on the Place de Grève, a maypole at the Chapelle de Braque, and a mystery at the Palais de Justice.
And in the yard was a brave bonfire with two gay little figures dancing around it, one of which gave an unearthly yell as the buggy turned in under the poplars.
"No," said the niece, "there is no reason for showing mercy to any of them; they have every one of them done mischief; better fling them out of the window into the court and make a pile of them and set fire to them; or else carry them into the yard, and there a bonfire can be made without the smoke giving any annoyance." The housekeeper said the same, so eager were they both for the slaughter of those innocents, but the curate would not agree to it without first reading at any rate the titles.
Matches, which he drops on the floor when lighted, are the greatest treat you can give David; indeed, I think his private heaven is a place with a roaring bonfire.
Up the beach by the boathouse a bonfire was burning, raining up sparks into the indistinctness of the dawn.
Never mind, Kitty, we'll go and see the bonfire to-morrow.' Here Alice wound two or three turns of the worsted round the kitten's neck, just to see how it would look: this led to a scramble, in which the ball rolled down upon the floor, and yards and yards of it got unwound again.
The Scarecrow will do nicely to start a bonfire, and the tin man can be cut into small pieces and fed to the goats.
I'd stand godfather to him, if he was to be christened in a bonfire, made of the ruins of the Bank of England.'