Bonhoeffer


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Bon·hoef·fer

 (bôn′hœ-fər), Dietrich 1906-1945.
German Protestant theologian whose works concern Christianity in the modern world. He was executed for his role in a plot to assassinate Hitler.

Bonhoeffer

(German ˈboːnhœfər)
n
(Biography) Dietrich (ˈdiːtrɪç). 1906–45, German Lutheran theologian: executed by the Nazis
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Noun1.Bonhoeffer - German Lutheran theologian and pastor whose works concern Christianity in the modern world; an active opponent of Nazism, he was arrested and sent to Buchenwald and later executed (1906-1945)
References in periodicals archive ?
Christ and Revelatory Community in Bonhoeffer's Reception of Hegel
The Faithful Spy: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the Plot to Kill Hitler.
Author-illustrator John Hendrix brings his considerable talents to this nonfiction graphic exploration of the German resistance during World War II and the fascinating story of theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Bonhoeffer, a double agent who played a role in the failed plot to kill Hitler, was hanged by the Nazis on April 9, 1945, just weeks before the end of the war.
Presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella is no Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the so-called Protestant saint who struggled to preach God in the godless world of Hitler.
Since Dietrich Bonhoeffer's death in 1945, executed by the Nazis as a political dissident, he has continued to fascinate and compel succeeding generations of readers as a theologian, witness, and martyr.
This paper uses the life of Dietrich Bonhoeffer to help explore the larger issue of what a Christian should do in the face of tyranny.
To many people, de Gruchy first became well-known as one who interpreted to the wider world the South African church situation under Apartheid in his seminal book The Church Struggle in South Africa (1979), a title that indicates the resonances he and others saw with the German Confessing Church's witness in Nazi Germany, and also his lifelong interest in Dietrich Bonhoeffer of whose theology he is a major interpreter.
Synopsis: "Dietrich Bonhoeffer's Ecumenical Quest" by British historian, theologian, and ecumenist Keith Clements aims to show how and why for Dietrich Bonhoeffer, from the conclusion of his student years in Berlin to his death on the Nazi gallows at Flossenburg, the ecumenical movement was central to his concerns.
Bonhoeffer fought against his own church's failure to critique a godless regime and is an example to us all when faced with similar situations.
Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the brilliant young Lutheran theologian and pastor, lamented in a letter to a theological friend: "The most sensible people have lost their heads and their entire Bible."
I presume then that Mr Lynch counts the Rev Martin Luther King and Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer as being among the weakminded, seeing as they both had what Mr Lynch would call "religion".