Boniface VIII


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Related to Boniface VIII: Clement V, Council of Constance, Conciliarism

Boniface VIII

Originally Benedetto Caetani. 1235?-1303.
Pope (1294-1303) who struggled to assert authority over England, France, and Sicily.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Boniface VIII

n
(Biography) original name Benedict Caetano. ?1234–1303, pope (1294–1303)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Boniface VIII - pope who declared that Catholic princes are subject to the pope in temporal as well as in theological matters (1235-1303)Boniface VIII - pope who declared that Catholic princes are subject to the pope in temporal as well as in theological matters (1235-1303)
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References in periodicals archive ?
(10.) Guido Boniface VIII as the one who turned him back to his old bad ways: "mi rimise ne le prime colpe" (Inf.
So we saw the actor look back over the first few centuries of the Dyer lineage, from his Viking forebears - "them what wore the funny hats" and "loved a good tear up" - to France's King Louis IX, who was canonised by Pope Boniface VIII in 1297.
King Philip IV of France wrote to his agents in Rome, commanding them to ask Pope Boniface VIII to view William Wallace favourably.The letter PROVESWALLACE played a role in the turbulent politics of medieval Europe, when the Pope was trying to encourage peace between England and France, and to challenge England's claim to control Scotland."
The community later became a target when conflict broke out between Pope Boniface VIII and the Colonna family [c.
Augustine was declared a Doctor of the Church by Pope Boniface VIII in 1303.
242) that shaped both the attack on Boniface VIII and the trial of the Templars.
Because the King of France (Philip IV) was taxing the Church to help finance his wars, Boniface VIII decided to declare that kings were subordinate to the power of the Church.
The Sicilian Guiscards' treatment of Pope Gregory VII and the French king Philip IV's brutalizing of Pope Boniface VIII come to mind.
Jennifer Petrie, in a recent Lectura Dantis, gives the often quoted reasons for Guido's punishment the account by the fourteenth-century chronicler Riccobaldo da Ferrara, according to whom Pope Boniface VIII asked Guido for help to sack the city of Palestrina, the stronghold of the Colonna, Boniface's enemy.
In a later dispute between Pope Boniface VIII and King Philip IV of France over the king's imposition of taxes on the clergy, Boniface wrote his famous decree, Unam sanctam, claiming papal supremacy in the temporal sphere.
Celestine's successor, Boniface VIII, feared that having another properly elected pope at large, even though that pope had resigned, could prove a threat.
The last pope to resign -- Celestine V in 1294 -- was locked up and perhaps killed off by his successor Boniface VIII and there is no record of the two ever meeting post-resignation.