Acts of the Apostles

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Acts of the Apostles

 (ăkts)
pl.n. (used with a sing. verb)
See Table at Bible.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Acts of the Apostles

n
(Bible) the fifth book of the New Testament, describing the development of the early Church from Christ's ascension into heaven to Paul's sojourn at Rome. Often shortened to: Acts
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Acts′ of the Apos′tles


n.
a book of the New Testament. Also called Acts.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Acts of the Apostles - a New Testament book describing the development of the early church from Christ's Ascension to Paul's sojourn at RomeActs of the Apostles - a New Testament book describing the development of the early church from Christ's Ascension to Paul's sojourn at Rome
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Apostelgeschichte
Apostolien teot

Acts of the Apostles

n (Bible) the Acts of the Apostlesgli Atti degli Apostoli
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In the book of Acts, Paul faced many situations where he didn't have all the answers.
These chapters introduce the ministry of miraculous healing, the word of knowledge in healing, faith response, and Jesus' anointing for healing, and a remarkable revelation into the study of living out the book of Acts in healing encounters and the manifestations of the Spirit.
It would be a very wise course for Mrs Dunn to take to heart the counsel presented by the Pharisee Gamaliel, recorded in the Bible, Book of Acts, Chapter 5, Verses 34 to 39.
Looking in turn at the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, they explore such topics as the woman who crashed Simon's party: a reader-response approach to Luke 7:36-50, a woman's touch: manual and emotional dynamics of female characters in Luke's gospel, the presence and presentation of Jesus as a character in the book of Acts, sight and spectacle: "seeing" Paul in the book of Acts, and Herod as Jesus' executioner: possibilities of Lukan reception and Wirkungsgeschichte.
Called to Lead: Paul's Letters to Timothy for a New Day continues the discussion from the authors' previous Called to Be Church: The Book of Acts for a New Day, and comes from the collaboration of a biblical scholar and a pastoral leader who use 1 and 2 Timothy as a foundation for congregational change.
AS I AM READING THROUGH the book of Acts right now I am again struck at how markedly different the gospel the first Christians preached was from what we so often hear today.
Death and resurrection; the shape and function of a literary motif in the book of Acts. (reprint, 2009)
One of the interesting and helpful parts of the book are the eleven Tables which look at Paul's works from various perspectives, including the differences between Paul and Jesus and a fascinating table which charts how the Book of Acts construes the parallel "passions" of both Jesus and Paul (Table 9).
* Regarding "Time of ambiguity shadows Maryknollers' assembly" (NCR, June 10): Apparently Paul could not have successfully confronted Peter (as in the Book of Acts) if the article relating the excommunication of Fr.
IT IS RECORDED in the Book of Acts that the earliest Christians "held everything in common and gave to each according as he had need".
He weaves Old and New Testament contexts together in the Book of Acts as he applies the scriptures to the 21st century, comparing for example, Ananias and Sapphira with Achan.
In the book of Acts, Peter becomes a strong and fearless leader of the early Christian community.