Book of Changes


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Book of Changes

n.

Book of Changes

n
(Other Non-Christian Religious Writings) another name for the I Ching
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References in periodicals archive ?
In some parables of "The book of reasonings and revelations" we find vestige from the Ancient Chinese "Book of changes" (Blyumkhem and Komissarov, 1991; Kirabaev, 1991; Kobzev, 1989; Shutsky, 1999).
KAREN HOLDEN's books include This Music and Book of Changes, and her poems appear on the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's website.
Mathematician Wilhelm Leibnitz deciphered I Ching (book of changes) into 64 predictions.
The I Ching (Book of Changes): A Critical Translation of the Ancient Text
Louisville, KY, February 05, 2014 --(PR.com)-- Author Jack Remick is proud to announce the recent release of his novel "The Book of Changes." "The Book of Changes" is a literary fiction novel that gives an impression of a time and place we all think we know a lot about, but really don't.
Jack Remick (author); THE BOOK OF CHANGES; Coffeetown Press (Fiction: Literary) 15.95 ISBN: 9781603811866
He'd been reading the I Ching - the book of changes - which gave him the idea of writing a song based on the first thing he saw on opening a book.
This emphasis on embryo is also related to the Han cosmology, and Kinney contends that the Chinese word embryo was corresponding to the word ji in the "Great Appendix" of the Book of Changes (Yi jing).
Richard Wilhelm, who introduced Chinese philosophy to the West with his German translation of the I Ching, or Book of Changes. He had a deep understanding of both Western and Eastern ways of thinking, and I identify with this because I am a Western PR consultant in Thailand working for Thai companies.
I Ching The Book of Changes and The Unchanging Truth
The book begins with an introduction to by John Porter (history & Asian studies, U of New Mexico), and contains verses, hexagrams, and Chinese characters from Richard Wilhelm's translation of I Ching, or Book of Changes.
And yet the work--from the point of view of words and images--with its constant woof and warp of despairs and affirmations and joys of Arab life can be entered, as if beginning were everywhere, at any given point, and one can find oneself in its meanings and revealed truths, so much so, with its dynamism of chanceless chance and destined accident/incident so much a part of the texture of the poems, I was impelled to compare it to the Chinese Book of Changes, at which one threw one's senses instead of coins, because there is a thread of oracularity in the work that underlies the many strata of imagery in which the whole panorama of the Arab world is embedded.