Book of Common Prayer


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Book of Common Prayer

n.
The book of services and prayers used in the Anglican Church.

Book of Common Prayer

n
(Anglicanism) the official book of church services of the Church of England, until 1980, when the Alternative Service Book was sanctioned

Book′ of Com′mon Prayer′


n.
the service book of the Anglican communion.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Book of Common Prayer - the Anglican service book of the Church of England; has had several revisions since the Reformation and is widely admired for the dignity and beauty of its language
Psalter, Book of Psalms - a collection of Psalms for liturgical use
Litany - a prayer consisting of a series of invocations by the priest with responses from the congregation
References in classic literature ?
"The book of Common Prayer is the composition of men like ourselves.
He had no fixed belief, but he went to the service of his church whenever it was held among us, and he revered the Book of Common Prayer while he disputed the authority of the Bible with all comers.
The Book of Common Prayer, now used in the English Church coordinately with Bible and Psalter, took shape out of previous primers of private devotion, litanies, and hymns, mainly as the work of Archbishop Cranmer during the reign of Edward VI.
A change to the Book of Common Prayer constitutes a change in doctrine of the church, as it effects Canon XIV, and must pass a vote at two successive General Synods by more than two-thirds majority in the orders of clergy, lay and bishops.
Professor Elmore offers chapter and verse evidence from the Bible as well as specific examples from the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer to illustrate how Lincoln borrowed from these sources to imbue his speech with meanings that would resonate with his listeners.
The library tweeted: "He found this 1666 Book of Common Prayer and returned it to us."
Gibbons's study is a continuation of the kind of historicist work accomplished by recent monographs on the literary influence of the Book of Common Prayer, most prominently Ramie Targoff's Common Prayer: The Language of Public Devotion in Early Modern England (University of Chicago Press, 2001) and Timothy Rosendale's Liturgy and Literature in the Making of Protestant England (Cambridge University Press, 2007).
Then, early in 1928, the Episcopal Church completed the revision of its Book of Common Prayer, which had been previously revised in 1892.
If the Book of Common Prayer remains the most important example of liturgical literature, another significant genre was the official primer.
It also contained an 1851 copy of the Book of Common Prayer and an extract from the New Testament.
The Book of Common Prayer: Past, Present and Future: A 350th Anniversary Celebration.
INDEPENDENCE DAY, GRENADA 1928: An amended version of the Book of Common Prayer was approved by the Church of England.