Book of Common Prayer


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Book of Common Prayer

n.
The book of services and prayers used in the Anglican Church.

Book of Common Prayer

n
(Anglicanism) the official book of church services of the Church of England, until 1980, when the Alternative Service Book was sanctioned

Book′ of Com′mon Prayer′


n.
the service book of the Anglican communion.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Book of Common Prayer - the Anglican service book of the Church of England; has had several revisions since the Reformation and is widely admired for the dignity and beauty of its language
Psalter, Book of Psalms - a collection of Psalms for liturgical use
Litany - a prayer consisting of a series of invocations by the priest with responses from the congregation
References in classic literature ?
The book of Common Prayer is the composition of men like ourselves.
He had no fixed belief, but he went to the service of his church whenever it was held among us, and he revered the Book of Common Prayer while he disputed the authority of the Bible with all comers.
The Book of Common Prayer, now used in the English Church coordinately with Bible and Psalter, took shape out of previous primers of private devotion, litanies, and hymns, mainly as the work of Archbishop Cranmer during the reign of Edward VI.
The original Book of Common Prayer was published in 1549, in the reign of Edward VI and was a product of the English Reformation following the break with Rome.
In England, during the reign of Edward VI (1547-53), Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer filled the gap in Anglican spirituality by putting together two editions of The Book of Common Prayer in 1549 and 1552.
Parliament banned the Book of Common Prayer in 1645, six days before Laud was executed, and four years before Charles suffered the same fate.
The Book of Common Prayer, first published in 1549 during the reign of the young Protestant, Edward VI, received its most significant revision soon after--in 1552--though it wasn't significant to the point of bewildering the public.
Professor Jeremy Dibble, a hymnologist at Durham University, said: "It was the only Christmas hymn to be approved by the Church of England in the 18th century and this allowed it to be disseminated across the country with the Book of Common Prayer.
Like the Book of Common Prayer, to browse in this as one does with an anthology is rewarding.
It convincingly demonstrates the centrality of the influential (and, among literary critics, understudied) Book of Common Prayer to an emerging national culture.
The Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts is on record supporting same-sex marriage, but priests can't perform same-sex weddings unless the national church changes rules for the use of rites in the Book of Common Prayer.
Spiritually, I have been nourished by Anglican liturgy, particularly the Book of Common Prayer, which, alas, Anglicans have almost completely abandoned.