Book of Common Prayer


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Book of Common Prayer

n.
The book of services and prayers used in the Anglican Church.

Book of Common Prayer

n
(Anglicanism) the official book of church services of the Church of England, until 1980, when the Alternative Service Book was sanctioned

Book′ of Com′mon Prayer′


n.
the service book of the Anglican communion.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Book of Common Prayer - the Anglican service book of the Church of England; has had several revisions since the Reformation and is widely admired for the dignity and beauty of its language
Psalter, Book of Psalms - a collection of Psalms for liturgical use
Litany - a prayer consisting of a series of invocations by the priest with responses from the congregation
References in classic literature ?
The book of Common Prayer is the composition of men like ourselves.
He had no fixed belief, but he went to the service of his church whenever it was held among us, and he revered the Book of Common Prayer while he disputed the authority of the Bible with all comers.
The Book of Common Prayer, now used in the English Church coordinately with Bible and Psalter, took shape out of previous primers of private devotion, litanies, and hymns, mainly as the work of Archbishop Cranmer during the reign of Edward VI.
Removing the prayer for the conversion of the Jews would require a motion to amend Canon XIV, The Book of Common Prayer.
The library tweeted: "He found this 1666 Book of Common Prayer and returned it to us.
Each press worked up layouts that can be seen in Martin Hutner's splendid The Making of the Book of Common Prayer.
If the Book of Common Prayer remains the most important example of liturgical literature, another significant genre was the official primer.
Arguably the 1662 version is the textual incarnation of the Book of Common Prayer most familiar today, both to adherents of the Anglican Church and to a wider culture beyond.
The story of the revisions of the English Book of Common Prayer is sometimes told with astonishing attention to what seem, to some non-specialists, to be insignificant details.
The Book of Common Prayer of 1662 - which most church-going Victorians would have known by heart - will be used.
The book offers an overview of their careers, details on their involvement in political matters, and their contrasting relationships with the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.
Professor Jeremy Dibble, a hymnologist at Durham University, said: "It was the only Christmas hymn to be approved by the Church of England in the 18th century and this allowed it to be disseminated across the country with the Book of Common Prayer.