Boothia


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Boo•thi•a

(ˈbu θi ə)

n.
1. a peninsula in N Canada: the northernmost part of the mainland of North America; former location of the north magnetic pole.
2. Gulf of, a gulf between this peninsula and Baffin Island.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Stein diamond property ('Stein') consists of 4 contiguous prospecting permits covering an area of 1,065 square kilometers on the Southern Boothia Peninsula, 45 kilometers from tide water.
The Stein diamond property ("Stein") consists of 4 contiguous prospecting permits covering an area of 1,065 square kilometers on the Southern Boothia Peninsula, 45 kilometers from tide water.
The Stein diamond property ( Stein ) consists of 4 contiguous prospecting permits covering an area of 1,065 square kilometers on the Southern Boothia Peninsula, 45 kilometers from tide water.
The 400-mile journey across the Boothia Peninsula in the Canadian Arctic was due to take up to 42 days while charting a dangerous course over a land of ice and snow in one of the world's most inhospitable regions.
Many explorers hoped that the land on the west side of this inlet (later called Boothia) was an island, and that it would be possible to follow the coastline from the bottom of the Gulf of Boothia westward to the Bering Strait.
Stratigraphy and conodonts of the upper Silurian and Lower Devonian rocks in the environs of the Boothia uplift, Canadian Arctic Achipelago.
An organiser said: "The Arctic Return Expedition team will embark upon on a 650-kilometre trek across Boothia Peninsula that will follow the route taken by Rae and his indigenous companions.
One segment will cross over land in the Boothia Peninsula, where a trench will be carved out of the permafrost to house the cable.
The incidents took place in Taloyoak on the Boothia peninsula in central Nunavut, where the motherless bears have been seen since September.
Remote sensing of arctic vegetation: relations between the NDVI, spatial resolution and vegetation cover on Boothia Peninsula, Nunavut.
Sunrise was launched from Kiruna in the north of Sweden and, after five days drifting over the Atlantic, it landed on the remote Boothia Peninsula in northern Canada, gathering information about the chromosphere throughout its journey.
From the Esquimaux of Boothia Felix [Rae] learned that a party of about forty white men were met on the west coast of King William's Island, and from thence travelled on to the mouth of the Great Fish River, where they all perished of starvation, and that this tragic event occurred apparently in the spring of 1850.