Boothia Peninsula


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Related to Boothia Peninsula: James Bay, Hudson Bay, Melville Peninsula, Schatchen

Boo·thi·a Peninsula

 (bo͞o′thē-ə)
The northernmost tip of the North American mainland, in central Nunavut, Canada. Extending north into the Arctic Archipelago, it is separated from Baffin Island to the east by the Gulf of Boothia.

Boothia Peninsula

(ˈbuːθɪə)
n
(Placename) a peninsula of N Canada: the northernmost part of the mainland of North America, lying west of the Gulf of Boothia, an arm of the Arctic Ocean
References in periodicals archive ?
The Stein diamond property ('Stein') consists of 4 contiguous prospecting permits covering an area of 1,065 square kilometers on the Southern Boothia Peninsula, 45 kilometers from tide water.
The Stein diamond property ( Stein ) consists of 4 contiguous prospecting permits covering an area of 1,065 square kilometers on the Southern Boothia Peninsula, 45 kilometers from tide water.
The 400-mile journey across the Boothia Peninsula in the Canadian Arctic was due to take up to 42 days while charting a dangerous course over a land of ice and snow in one of the world's most inhospitable regions.
When we asked for clarification on this place, kingailaup tuktuit was always translated as a specific reference to the island directly north of Qikiqtaq, known in English as Prince of Wales Island, although Kingailaq is also the Inuktitut name for Boothia Peninsula (Fig.
An organiser said: "The Arctic Return Expedition team will embark upon on a 650-kilometre trek across Boothia Peninsula that will follow the route taken by Rae and his indigenous companions.
The portion of the route over northern Canada and the Boothia Peninsula is the most difficult because of icing issues, so further studies are continuing in those areas, Pfeffer says.
The incidents took place in Taloyoak on the Boothia peninsula in central Nunavut, where the motherless bears have been seen since September.
In 1937, he engaged the support of the New England Museum of Natural History and went north to Ellesmere and Baffin islands and the Boothia Peninsula. He returned to the Territories in 1938, working his way from Isle a la Crosse to Great Bear Lake.
In 1854, John Rae, a Scotsman, doctor, and Canadian immigrant endowed with incredible endurance, physical stamina, and empathy for native culture rare in Victorian days, led a party of explorers across the Boothia Peninsula to map the missing link in the Northwest Passage.
Over the next 10 hours we landed in Gjoa Haven on King William Island, Pelly Bay, and finally Taloyoak on the Boothia Peninsula, where I talked with many locals about polar bears, Arctic char, and endless winters.
In her introduction, Eber notes that a disproportionate number understandably pertain to the expeditions that had the most interaction with Inuit: William Edward Parry's second voyage 1821-23 (to Igloolik), John Ross's second voyage 1829-33 (to the area of Thom Bay, halfway down the east coast of Boothia Peninsula), and Roald Amundsen's successful voyage in a fishing smack through the northwest passage 1903-6 (including his two winters on King William Island at what became the village of Gjoa Haven).
The first explorers to find the north magnetic pole did so at Cape Adelaide, on the west coast of Canada's Boothia Peninsula, in 1831.