Boraginaceae


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Boraginaceae: Hydrophyllaceae, Scrophulariaceae
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Boraginaceae - a widely distributed family of plants distinguished by circinate flowers and nutlike fruit
plant family - a family of plants
order Polemoniales, Polemoniales - Polemoniaceae; Solanaceae; Boraginaceae; Labiatae; Lentibulariaceae; Pedaliaceae; in some classifications includes the order Scrophulariales
Borago, genus Borago - perennial herbs of the Mediterranean region
Amsinckia, genus Amsinckia - rough annual herbs of Europe and the Americas: fiddlenecks
genus Anchusa - rough and hairy Old World herbs
Cordia, genus Cordia - tropical deciduous or evergreen trees or shrubs of the family Boraginaceae
Cynoglossum, genus Cynoglossum - a large genus of tall rough herbs belonging to the family Boraginaceae
Echium, genus Echium - a genus of bristly herbs and shrubs of the family Boraginaceae
genus Hackelia, genus Lappula, Hackelia, Lappula - stickweed; beggar's lice
genus Lithospermum, Lithospermum - annual or perennial herbaceous or shrubby plants; cosmopolitan except Australia
genus Mertensia, Mertensia - a genus of herbs belonging to the family Boraginaceae that grow in temperate regions and have blue or purple flowers shaped like funnels
genus Myosotis, Myosotis - forget-me-nots; scorpion grass
genus Onosmodium, Onosmodium - a genus of North American perennial herbs of the family Boraginaceae
References in periodicals archive ?
Boraginaceae is a large family about 100 genera and 2000 species.
Descriptions and notes on the wood anatomy of Boraginaceae from western Mexico.
123 Lythraceae Cuphea hyssopifolia 124 Malvaceae Malva sylvestris 125 Equisetaceae Equisetum bogotense 126 Phytolaccaceae Phytolacca bogotensis 127 Asteraceae Taraxacum officinale 128 Solanaceae Solanum nigrum 129 Plantaginaceae Plantago major 130 Amaranthaceae Chenopodium ambrosioides 131 Adoxaceae Sambucus nigra 132 Malvaceae Sparrmannia africana 133 Boraginaceae Borago officinalis 134 Bromeliaceae Bromelia plumieri 135 Asteraceae Achyrocline satureioides 136 Apiaceae Niphogeton glaucescens 137 Lamiaceae Lepechinia salvifolia 138 Myrtaceae Eucalyptus globulus 139 Urticaceae Parietaria debilis 140 Polygonaceae Rumex crispus 141 Asteraceae Stevia lucida 142 Solanaceae Brugmansia sanguinea 143 Piperaceae Piper bogotense 144 Rosaceae Sanguisorba minor 145 Oxalidaceae Oxalis sp.
BETULACEAE Alnus acuminata * BORAGINACEAE Borago officinalis Phacelia pinnatifida * BRASSICACEAE Brassica sp.
2014) and is considered as a family (instead of as a subfamily of Boraginaceae s.
From the physiognomic point of view, the authors also mentioned the Sapindaceae, Salicaceae, Meliaceae, Boraginaceae, Moraceae, Arecaceae and Sapotaceae families.
Estrato dominante arbustivo; Asteraceae, Boraginaceae e islas de Polygonaceae de 2-3 m de altura y arbolitos esporadicos de 7-8 m de altura (Polygonaceae).
Cordia alliodora, familia Boraginaceae, comunmente conocido como laurel, es una especie de hoja caduca y de rapido crecimiento con amplia distribucion geografica en las islas del Caribe y desde el norte de Mexico a traves de America Central hasta Paraguay, el sur de Brasil y el norte de Argentina (CATIE, 1994).
Trachystemon orientalis ydi ei enw gwyddonol ac mae'n perthyn i'r teulu Boraginaceae, sef teulu tafod yr ych.
Brunnera flowers are like spaced-out forget-me-nots - not surprisingly, it belongs to the same family, the borages, boraginaceae, and so too does the last group of perennials.
The top 10 families with a large number of seed accessions in SSBH include Poaceae, Fabaceae, Amaranthaceae, Asteraceae, Brassicaceae, Boraginaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Convolvulaceae, and Zygophyllaceae (Fig.
Studies have shown that cordia (Cordia trichotoma), a native tree species of the Boraginaceae family, presents propagules with low-rooting competence, because unsatisfying rhizogenesis responses have been obtained in both mini-cuttings of adult shoots and cuttings (FICK, 2007; HEBERLE et al.