Borders


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bor·der

 (bôr′dər)
n.
1. A part that forms the outer edge of something.
2. A decorative strip around the edge of something, such as fabric.
3. A strip of ground, as at the edge of a garden or walk, in which ornamental plants or shrubs are planted.
4. The line or frontier area separating political divisions or geographic regions; a boundary.
v. bor·dered, bor·der·ing, bor·ders
v.tr.
1. To lie along or adjacent to the border of: Canada borders the United States.
2. To put a border on.
v.intr.
1. To lie adjacent to another: The United States borders on Canada.
2. To be almost like another in character: an act that borders on heroism.

[Middle English bordure, from Old French bordeure, from border, to border, from bort, border, of Germanic origin.]

bor′der·er n.
Synonyms: border, edge, margin, verge1, brink, rim
These nouns refer to the line that marks the outside limit of something, such as a surface or shape, or to the area just inside such a line. Border can refer to either the line (a fence along the border of the property) or the adjacent area (a frame with a wide border). Edge refers to the bounding line formed by the continuous convergence of two surfaces (sat on the edge of the wall) or to an outer line or limit (a leaf with serrated edges; stopped at the edge of the water). Margin generally refers to a strip that runs along an edge or border: the margin of the page; the grassy margins of a path. A verge is an extreme terminating line or edge: the sun's afterglow on the verge of the horizon. Figuratively it indicates a point at which something is likely to begin or to happen: an explorer on the verge of a great discovery. Brink denotes the edge of a steep place: stood on the brink of the cliff. In an extended sense it indicates the likelihood or imminence of a sudden change: on the brink of falling in love. Rim most often denotes the edge of something circular or curved: a cup with a chipped rim; the rim of a basketball goal; lava issuing from the rim of the crater.

Bor•ders

(ˈbɔr dərz)

n.
a region in SE Scotland. 105,700; 1804 sq. mi. (4671 sq. km).
References in classic literature ?
A pleasant old garden on the borders of the lovely lake, with chestnuts rustling overhead, ivy climbing everywhere, and the black shadow of the tower falling far across the sunny water.
Copan is a city, or maybe we'll find it only a town when we get there, and it is not far from the borders of Guatemala.
The lengthened sheet of the Champlain stretched from the frontiers of Canada, deep within the borders of the neighboring province of New York, forming a natural passage across half the distance that the French were compelled to master in order to strike their enemies.
He was a middle-aged and really handsome man, with a wig flowing down upon his shoulders; his coat was of blue velvet, with lace on the borders and at the button-holes; and the firelight glistened on the spacious breadth of his waistcoat, which was flowered all over with gold.
The chaplain had not yet arrived; and there these silent islands of men and women sat steadfastly eyeing several marble tablets, with black borders, masoned into the wall on either side the pulpit.
In no living thing are the lines of beauty more exquisitely defined than in the crescentic borders of these flukes.
On its borders I trust we stand; and the throes that now convulse the nations are, to my hope, but the birth-pangs of an hour of universal peace and brotherhood.
I often think that I should like to have my house front on this mass of dull red bushes, omitting other flower plots and borders, transplanted spruce and trim box, even graveled walks--to have this fertile spot under my windows, not a few imported barrowfuls of soil only to cover the sand which was thrown out in digging the cellar.
It lieth a two-day journey hence, by the borders of the land that hight the Cuckoo Kingdom.
Harris and I took some guides and porters and ascended to the Ho^tel des Pyramides, which is perched on the high moraine which borders the Glacier des Bossons.
If you will look at the balls of your fingers-- you that have very sharp eyesight--you will observe that these dainty curving lines lie close together, like those that indicate the borders of oceans in maps, and that they form various clearly defined patterns, such as arches, circles, long curves, whorls, etc.
He wanted to explore its borders, but concluded that it would be best to sit down and rest awhile, first.