Bosworth Field


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Bos·worth Field

 (bŏz′wərth)
A locality in central England near Leicester. It was the site of the final battle (August 22, 1485) of the Wars of the Roses, in which Henry Tudor (afterward Henry VII) defeated Richard III, the last king of the Plantagenet line. Richard was killed in the battle.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bosworth Field

(ˈbɒzwɜːθ; -wəθ)
n
(Placename) English history the site, two miles south of Market Bosworth in Leicestershire, of the battle that ended the Wars of the Roses (August 1485). Richard III was killed and Henry Tudor was crowned king as Henry VII
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bos′worth Field′

(ˈbɒz wərθ)
n.
a battlefield in central England where Richard III was defeated by the future Henry VII in 1485.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bosworth Field - the battle that ended the Wars of the Roses (1485); Richard III was killed and Henry Tudor was crowned as Henry VII
War of the Roses, Wars of the Roses - struggle for the English throne (1455-1485) between the house of York (white rose) and the house of Lancaster (red rose) ending with the accession of the Tudor monarch Henry VII
Leicester, Leicestershire - a largely agricultural county in central England
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
They ended at length in 1485 with Bosworth field, by which Henry VII became King.
Wopsle died amiably at Camberwell, and exceedingly game on Bosworth Field, and in the greatest agonies at Glastonbury.
1485: The Battle of Bosworth Field was fought in Leicestershire and Richard III was butchered as he vainly tried to reach the usurper Henry Tudor.
Not only wasCoventry the country's capital on a number of occasions during the medieval period, it was also so important to the crown, that Henry Tudor made it his first port of call following his defeat of Richard III at Bosworth Field.
Experts say the "Red Portrait" on show at the city's New Walk Museum was propaganda by the Tudors, who defeated him at Bosworth Field in 1485.
In which English county did the battle of Bosworth Field take place?
GOOGLING A RUNNER Ambion Hill 5.25 Exeter Ambion Hill is a hill based in west Leicestershire, south of Market Bosworth, and is considered to be the site of the Battle of Bosworth Field. In 1577 The chronicler Raphael Holinshed wrote that Richard III "pitched his field on a hill called Anne Beame, refreshed his soldiers and took his rest".
Many members of the public only became aware a few days before a planning meeting that the expansion of a neighbouring technology park would eat into part of Bosworth Field.
Many members of the public only became aware last week that the expansion of a neighbouring technology park would eat into part of Bosworth Field.
What proposed development on the site of the 1485 Battle of Bosworth Field has raised the concerns of historians?
| August 22 THE short reign of King Richard III came to a bloody end today in 1485, at Bosworth Field, when he was killed in battle.
Richard was killed at Bosworth Field in 1485 at the end of the Wars of the Roses.