botulinum toxin

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botulinum toxin

(ˌbɒtjʊˈlaɪnəm)
n
(Medicine) a pharmaceutical formulation of botulin used in minute doses to treat various forms of muscle spasm and for the cosmetic removal of wrinkles. See Botox
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.botulinum toxin - any of several neurotoxins that are produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum; causes muscle paralysis
Botox, botulinum toxin A - a neurotoxin (trade name Botox) that is used clinically in small quantities to treat strabismus and facial spasms and other neurological disorders characterized by abnormal muscle contractions; is also used by cosmetic surgeons to smooth frown lines temporarily
neurolysin, neurotoxin - any toxin that affects neural tissues
Translations

botulinum toxin

n toxina botulínica
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the first time a botulinum neurotoxin has been found outside of Clostridium botulinum -- and not just the toxin, but an entire unit containing the toxin and associated proteins that prevent the toxin from being degraded in the GI tract," says Min Dong, PhD, a scientist in Boston Children's Hospital's Department of Urology and Harvard Medical School and one of the world's experts on botulinum toxins.
Forms of Botox: Seven types of botulinum toxins have been isolated but only two types A and B have been made commercially available.
Use of botulinum toxins for chronic headaches: A focused review.
It was reported yesterday that the collaboration is aimed at discovering novel engineered botulinum toxins, targeting serious neurologic diseases.
Specialty-driven pharmaceutical company Ipsen (Euronext:IPN) announced today the initiation of a research and development collaboration on novel engineered botulinum toxins with Harvard Medical School (Harvard).
of California San Francisco) present a reference outlining specific techniques for performing injections of botulinum toxins in the head and neck for dystonias like blepharospasm; functional disorders like headaches, salivary gland disorders, and Frey's syndrome; and cosmetic applications like forehead and brow repositioning, periorbital rejuvenation, and treatment of facial paralysis and synkinesis.
To reduce the rate and severity of local reactions, vaccinees with continued potential for occupational exposure to botulinum toxins were given booster injections at the 2-year interval only if a 1:16 dilution of their serum did not protect mice in serotypes B and E toxin challenge studies (indicative of an antibody concentration of >0.
The warning will go on all approved botulinum toxins: Botox and Botox Cosmetic (both type A, Allergan), the just-approved type A product Dysport (Medicis and Ipsen), and the botulinum toxin type B product Myobloc (Solstice Neurosciences).
Botulinum toxins act by interfering with nerve-muscle communication.
8 advising patients and physicians that botulinum toxins have in some cases been linked to respiratory failure and even death.
Botulinum toxins are taken up by nerve cells through pinocytosis and mediate their action by binding to neuromuscular junctions and preventing acetylcholine release leading to muscular paralysis (16).