bounty


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to bounty: Mutiny on the Bounty, HMS Bounty

boun·ty

 (boun′tē)
n. pl. boun·ties
1. Liberality in giving.
2. Something given liberally.
3. A reward, inducement, or payment, especially one given by a government for acts deemed beneficial to the state, such as killing predatory animals, growing certain crops, starting certain industries, or enlisting for military service.

[Middle English bounte, from Old French bonte, from Latin bonitās, goodness, from bonus, good; see deu- in Indo-European roots.]

bounty

(ˈbaʊntɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. generosity in giving to others; liberality
2. a generous gift; something freely provided
3. a payment made by a government, as, formerly, to a sailor on enlisting or to a soldier after a campaign
4. any reward or premium: a bounty of 20p for every rat killed.
[C13 (in the sense: goodness): from Old French bontet, from Latin bonitās goodness, from bonus good]

Bounty

(ˈbaʊntɪ)
n
(Nautical Terms) a British naval ship commanded by Captain William Bligh, which was on a scientific voyage in 1789 between Tahiti and the West Indies when her crew mutinied

boun•ty

(ˈbaʊn ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a premium or reward, esp. one offered by a government.
2. a generous gift.
3. generosity.
[1200–50; Middle English b(o)unte < Anglo-French, Old French bonte, Old French bontet < Latin bonitātem]
boun′ty•less, adj.
syn: See bonus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bounty - payment or reward (especially from a government) for acts such as catching criminals or killing predatory animals or enlisting in the militarybounty - payment or reward (especially from a government) for acts such as catching criminals or killing predatory animals or enlisting in the military
governing, government activity, government, governance, administration - the act of governing; exercising authority; "regulations for the governing of state prisons"; "he had considerable experience of government"
reward - payment made in return for a service rendered
2.bounty - the property of copious abundancebounty - the property of copious abundance  
abundance, copiousness, teemingness - the property of a more than adequate quantity or supply; "an age of abundance"
3.bounty - generosity evidenced by a willingness to give freely
generosity, generousness - the trait of being willing to give your money or time
4.Bounty - a ship of the British navy; in 1789 part of the crew mutinied against their commander William Bligh and set him afloat in an open boat

bounty

noun (Literary)
1. generosity, charity, assistance, kindness, philanthropy, benevolence, beneficence, liberality, almsgiving, open-handedness, largesse or largess The aid organization would not allow such bounty.
2. abundance, plenty, exuberance, profusion, affluence, plenitude, copiousness, plenteousness autumn's bounty of fruits, seeds and berries
3. reward, present, grant, prize, payment, gift, compensation, bonus, premium, donation, recompense, gratuity, meed (archaic), largesse or largess They paid bounties for people to give up their weapons.

bounty

noun
A sum of money offered for a special service, such as the apprehension of a criminal:
Translations
كَرَم، جودهِبَةٌ، عَطِيَّةٌ
darštědrost
generøs gaveoverflod
palkkio
örlætivegleg gjöf
dóvanos
balvadāsnumsdevībavelte
cömertçe verilen hediyecömertlikeli açıklıkihsan

bounty

[ˈbaʊntɪ]
A. N
1. (= generosity) → generosidad f, munificencia f
2. (= reward) → recompensa f (Mil) → premio m de enganche
B. CPD bounty hunter Ncazarrecompensas mf inv

bounty

[ˈbaʊnti] n (= generosity) [person, nature] → générosité f; [season] → abondance f
(= reward) → prime fbounty hunter nchasseur m de primes

bounty

n
(= generosity)Freigebigkeit f; (of nature)reiche Fülle (geh)
(= gift)großzügige or reiche Gabe (geh)
(= reward money)Kopfgeld nt

bounty

:
bounty-fed
adj (Econ) → subventioniert
bounty hunter
nKopfgeldjäger(in) m(f)

bounty

[ˈbaʊntɪ] n (generosity) → liberalità, munificenza; (reward) → taglia

bounty

(ˈbaunti) noun
1. generosity in giving.
2. (plural ˈbounties) something given out of generosity.
References in classic literature ?
Though she cheered him much with the bounty of her countenance," says an early writer of Bacon's life, his friend and chaplain,* "yet she never cheered him with the bounty of her hand.
I mean, that we are liable to be imposed upon, and to confer our choicest favours often on the undeserving, as you must own was your case in your bounty to that worthless fellow Partridge: for two or three such examples must greatly lessen the inward satisfaction which a good man would otherwise find in generosity; nay, may even make him timorous in bestowing, lest he should be guilty of supporting vice, and encouraging the wicked; a crime of a very black dye, and for which it will by no means be a sufficient excuse, that we have not actually intended such an encouragement; unless we have used the utmost caution in chusing the objects of our beneficence.
But I, to my misfortune, always served place-hunters and adventurers, whose keep and wages were so miserable and scanty that half went in paying for the starching of one's collars; it would be a miracle indeed if a page volunteer ever got anything like a reasonable bounty.
And Romance lured and beckoned before Joan's eyes when she learned he was Christian Young, a Norfolk Islander, but a direct descendant of John Young, one of the original Bounty mutineers.
Whatever was her own in the house, everything which she had acquired aside from her husband's bounty, she caused to be transported to the other house, supplying simple and meager deficiencies from her own resources.
there’s a bounty on the scalps—but—will your dogs hunt painters, Natty?
He proclaimed him- self an agnostic and was so absorbed in destroying the ideas of God that had crept into the minds of his neighbors that he never saw God manifesting himself in the little child that, half forgotten, lived here and there on the bounty of her dead mother's relatives.
We are all very thankful for your bounty, but it won't do for us to take the landlord's grain," said a voice at the back of the crowd.
I wonder at the goodness of God; the generosity of my friends; the bounty of my lot.
 instance of the Creator's bounty in providing for the lives of His
I found some of it hard to endure, though I am a mild-tempered man; but, certainly, when I told the captain to "shut up" I had forgotten that I was merely a bit of human flotsam, cut off from my resources and with my fare unpaid; a mere casual dependant on the bounty, or speculative enterprise, of the ship.
My mind, however, is now made up on the subject, for having received ordination at Easter, I have been so fortunate as to be distinguished by the patronage of the Right Honourable Lady Catherine de Bourgh, widow of Sir Lewis de Bourgh, whose bounty and beneficence has preferred me to the valuable rectory of this parish, where it shall be my earnest endeavour to demean myself with grateful respect towards her Ladyship, and be ever ready to perform those rites and ceremonies which are instituted by the Church of England.