Bourke-White


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Bourke-White

(bûrk′wīt′, -hwīt′), Margaret 1906-1971.
American photographer and writer. During her career at Life magazine (1936-1969), she photographed such diverse subjects as the rural South, Soviet life, and the release of concentration camp victims.

Bourke-White

(ˌbɜːkˈwaɪt)
n
(Biography) Margaret. 1906–71, US photographer, a pioneer of modern photojournalism: noted esp for her coverage of World War II

Bourke-White

(ˈbɜrkˈʰwaɪt, -ˈwaɪt)

n.
Margaret, 1906–71, U.S. photographer and author.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The resulting photos of Gandhi's last day of life and the events surrounding his funeral helped catapult Cartier-Bresson to international fame when they were published in life, eclipsing those of the American photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White who was there officially representing the magazine.
Margaret Bourke-White and the Dawn of Apartheid (Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2016, pp.
In the spring of 1942, the War Department reluctantly bent its rule, allowing Life magazine photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White to become the first accredited female war correspondent to cover combat, largely due to her acclaimed photos of the Moscow Kremlin being bombed by the Germans in 1941.
There are bikers in California and burlesque dancers (1936) surprisingly captured by legendary photo-journalist Margaret Bourke-White, who worked for Life magazine (shooting their first cover) for many years documenting the 20th century.
The fact that the striking cover image of Margaret Bourke-White was taken by a man (Oscar Graubner) could spark a conversation or two, and perhaps that's a good thing.
Barely a month after independence, Jinnah was self-confidently boasting before Margaret Bourke-White, an American journalist, that, America needs Pakistan more than Pakistan needs America.
Profiles of such giants of the past as Matthew Brady, Sebastian Salgado, Margaret Bourke-White, and Alfred Stieglitz particularize developments in diagonal thrust, chiaroscuro, and the use of platinotype.
With the exception of a few Life photographers, such as Margaret Bourke-White, Hansel Mieth, Otto Hagel, and Alfred Eisenstaedt, Quirke pays little attention to individual artistic style, which may disappoint photography historians preferring a more art-historical perspective.
This picture was photographed by Margaret Bourke-White, who was a famous photographer and documentary maker.
H: War photography has traditionally been a very macho endeavor, but of course there are many great women war photographers, starting perhaps with Gerda Taro during the Spanish Civil War and Lee Miller and Margaret Bourke-White during World War II.
The book is based on interviews with writers and photographers who worked all over the world, profiling big names such as photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White, as well as less-known journalists such as Dorothy Thompson and Sigrid Schultz, who headed opposition news bureaus in Berlin and later contributed to popular women's magazines upon their anticlimactic return to the US.
Measuring tensions between "modernism" and "populism," the investigation is particularly illuminating when comparing, for example, the photographs of Margaret Bourke-White with Walker Evans, or the literary achievements of Nora Zeale Hurston with Richard Wright (507).