Bow Street runner

Bow Street runner

(bəʊ)
n
(Historical Terms) (in Britain from 1749 to 1829) an officer at Bow Street magistrates' court, London, whose duty was to pursue and arrest criminals
Translations

Bow Street runner

n (Brit, Hist) → Büttel m (der offiziellen Detektei in der Londoner Bow Street)
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References in classic literature ?
All the time he was jerking out these phrases he was stumping up and down the tavern on his crutch, slapping tables with his hand, and giving such a show of excitement as would have convinced an Old Bailey judge or a Bow Street runner.
We are Bow Street runners, and we've got you for coining.
The minutes were getting on, and I had not heard a word yet, through the peephole, on the subject of the reserve of Bow Street runners outside.
The first time a bullet was forensically traced back to a particular gun was in 1835 when Bow Street Runner Henry Goddard Bow Street Runner Henry Goddard was called to the house of a Mrs was called to the house of a Mrs Maxwell in Southampton.
It was from the BBC about his appearance on The Morecambe and Wise Show in January 1976, when he commentated on the Grand National field being joined mid-race by Eric as Dick Turpin on Black Bess and Ernie as a pursuing Bow Street Runner.
IN the seedy and dangerous London of 1829, Pyke, a Bow Street Runner, is investigating a series of brutal murders.
The sign has gone up at the entrance to a Russian vodka bar called the Bow Street Runner.
My new drinking buddies, Billy The Blade and Little Frankie (also known as the Bow Street Runner after skipping bail in London) joined me in a Torremolinos toast.
Among their topics are blasphemy, the Bow Street runners, capital punishment in England and Wales, discharged prisoners' aid societies, first-wave feminism, indentured labor, lethal violence in Scotland, medical testimony in the judicial sphere, police court missionaries, the respectable criminal, slavery in the Americas, the criminal underworld, white-collar crime, and workhouse children.
The good folk of Stourbridge were horrified by the murder and soon the clamour for justice became so great that two of the finest detectives of their day, Bow Street Runners Harry Atkins and Sam Taunton, were called from The Smoke.
London's first professional policemen, the Bow Street Runners, founded in 1749 by Westminster magistrate Henry Fielding , served writs and arrested criminals and would have carried tipstaves and truncheons, but the former were superseded in 1829, when a Bill introduced by Sir Robert Peel, the Home Secretary in Lord Liverpool's Tory Cabinet, established the Metropolitan Police Force.
calls Fielding 'Fieldman', but this was a real historical figure, either the novelist Henry Fielding or his brother John, founders of the Bow Street Runners, London's earliest police force, which dates the action to sometime after 1749.