Bow Street runner

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Bow Street runner

(bəʊ)
n
(Historical Terms) (in Britain from 1749 to 1829) an officer at Bow Street magistrates' court, London, whose duty was to pursue and arrest criminals
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

Bow Street runner

n (Brit, Hist) → Büttel m (der offiziellen Detektei in der Londoner Bow Street)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in classic literature ?
We are Bow Street runners, and we've got you for coining."
The minutes were getting on, and I had not heard a word yet, through the peephole, on the subject of the reserve of Bow Street runners outside.
* The "Bow Street runners" of those days were the predecessors of the detective police of the present time.
All the time he was jerking out these phrases he was stumping up and down the tavern on his crutch, slapping tables with his hand, and giving such a show of excitement as would have convinced an Old Bailey judge or a Bow Street runner. My suspicions had been thoroughly reawakened on finding Black Dog at the Spy- glass, and I watched the cook narrowly.
As well as harsh punishments, different types of 'crime management' were employed, from the 'Watchmen' to the 'Bow Street Runners.'.
A particular man: the dashing and roguish Daffin Oakleaf, a member of the Bow Street Runners, London's first police force.
Police forces had come a long way from the Peelers of 1829 and the Bow Street Runners of 1753 Courtesy George Marshall
Among their topics are blasphemy, the Bow Street runners, capital punishment in England and Wales, discharged prisoners' aid societies, first-wave feminism, indentured labor, lethal violence in Scotland, medical testimony in the judicial sphere, police court missionaries, the respectable criminal, slavery in the Americas, the criminal underworld, white-collar crime, and workhouse children.
The good folk of Stourbridge were horrified by the murder and soon the clamour for justice became so great that two of the finest detectives of their day, Bow Street Runners Harry Atkins and Sam Taunton, were called from The Smoke.
London's first professional policemen, the Bow Street Runners, founded in 1749 by Westminster magistrate Henry Fielding , served writs and arrested criminals and would have carried tipstaves and truncheons, but the former were superseded in 1829, when a Bill introduced by Sir Robert Peel, the Home Secretary in Lord Liverpool's Tory Cabinet, established the Metropolitan Police Force.
At the time the capital had random parish constables and watchmen, known as the 'Bow Street Runners',' as well as the Marine Police Force to combat crime in the docks.
He actually .calls Fielding 'Fieldman', but this was a real historical figure, either the novelist Henry Fielding or his brother John, founders of the Bow Street Runners, London's earliest police force, which dates the action to sometime after 1749.