intestine

(redirected from Bowel control)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Bowel control: Faecal incontinence
click for a larger image
intestine
A. stomach
B. large intestine
C. small intestine
D. rectum
E. anus
F. appendix
G. cecum

in·tes·tine

 (ĭn-tĕs′tĭn)
n. often intestines
The portion of the digestive tract extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consisting of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine.
adj.
Internal; civil: the intestine affairs of the nation.

[Middle English, from Old French intestin, from Latin intestīna, intestines, from neuter pl. of intestīnus, internal, from intus, within; see en in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

intestine

(ɪnˈtɛstɪn)
n
(Anatomy) (usually plural) the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anus. See large intestine, small intestine
[C16: from Latin intestīnum gut, from intestīnus internal, from intus within]
intestinal adj
inˈtestinally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•tes•tine

(ɪnˈtɛs tɪn)

n.
1. Usu., intestines. the lower part of the alimentary canal, extending from the pylorus to the anus.
2. Also called small intestine. the narrow, longer part of the intestines, comprising the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, that serves to digest and absorb nutrients.
3. Also called large intestine. the broad, shorter part of the intestines, comprising the cecum, colon, and rectum, that absorbs water from and eliminates the residues of digestion.
adj.
4. internal; domestic; civil: intestine strife.
[1525–35; < Latin intestīnum, n. use of neuter of intestīnus internal]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
click for a larger image
intestine

in·tes·tine

(ĭn-tĕs′tĭn)
The part of the digestive tract that extends from the stomach to the anus, consisting of the small intestine and large intestine. The intestine is a muscular tube in which most of the processes of digestion take place.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intestine - the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anusintestine - the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anus
internal organ, viscus - a main organ that is situated inside the body
hindgut - the caudal part of the alimentary canal in vertebrate embryos
small intestine - the longest part of the alimentary canal; where digestion is completed
large intestine - beginning with the cecum and ending with the rectum; includes the cecum and the colon and the rectum; extracts moisture from food residues which are later excreted as feces
abdomen, belly, stomach, venter - the region of the body of a vertebrate between the thorax and the pelvis
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مَعْى
budellintestí
střevo
tarm
suolisuolisto
bél
görn, òarmur
腸管
zarnažarnų
zarna
intestin
črevo
inälvortarm
ลำไส้
ruột

intestine

[ɪnˈtestɪn] Nintestino m
small/large intestineintestino m delgado/grueso
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

intestine

[ɪnˈtɛstɪn] nintestin m large intestine, small intestine
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

intestine

nDarm m; small/large intestineDünn-/Dickdarm m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

intestine

[ɪnˈtɛstɪn] nintestino
large intestine → (intestino) crasso
small intestine → (intestino) tenue m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

intestine

(inˈtestin) noun
(often in plural) the lower part of the food passage in man and animals.
intestinal (intesˈtainl) , ((especially American) inˈtestinl) adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

in·tes·tine

n. intestino, tubo digestivo que se extiende del píloro al ano;
large ______ grueso;
small ______ delgado.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

intestine

n intestino, tripa (fam, frec. pl); large — intestino grueso, colon m; small — intestino delgado
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Sarah Brewer, medical director at Healthspan (healthspan.co.uk), says: "Telltale signs include weakness or numbness in one or both legs, severe pain causing immobility, pains shooting down the leg, difficulty with bladder and bowel control or pins and needles at the base of the spine or lower legs."
It also results when the pelvic muscles are stretched and weakened or the perineum is torn, which affects bowel control.Faecal incontinence lasts for several months.
Strong pelvic floor muscles are essential for good bladder and bowel control. They also aid abdominal muscles to support your spine.
There is not a lot of extra tissue in the rectal area to begin with and surgeons want to avoid damaging nerves and muscles involved with bowel control.
As a result, they may have symptoms like difficulty walking, feeling tired, muscle weakness or spasms, blurred or double vision, numbness and tingling, poor bladder or bowel control, pain, depression and problems focusing or remembering," added Dr Deleu.
Weakened, they can cause all sorts of bladder and bowel control issues.
But a representative for the actress told the Mirror: "Boo has some serious bowel control issues.
But a representative for the actress said: "Boo has some serious bowel control issues.
5 BLADDER AND BOWEL ISSUES EVERYONE can benefit from regular pelvic floor exercises to help improve bladder and bowel control, whatever your age.
"He is bed-ridden with poor bladder and bowel control requiring total dependence on his parents for all activities of daily living," said the report.
To address possible influence of other disease-related symptoms, measures of overall disability (Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite Scale), (19) cognition (Controlled Oral Word Association Test), (20) and pain, fatigue, perceived cognitive deficits, and bladder and bowel control (pain effects, modified fatigue impact, perceived deficits, bladder control, and bowel control subscales of the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Index) (21) were included.